Commercial fishing generated more than half a million jobs in 2012

JobsImpactsCFSUSASource of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (2014).  
Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/msannualcommercialfishingjobs.html

Commercial harvesting of fish and shellfish created total economic impacts exceeding $13 billion in 2012

SalesImpactsCFSUSASource of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (2014).
Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/msannualcommercialfishing.html

Fish and seafood markets created total economic impacts exceeding $5.8 billion in 2012

SalesImpactsFMUSA

Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. 
Read more about economic impacts of Mississippi, Gulf of Mexico and United States fish and seafood markets at http://gomos.msstate.edu/msannualretailingsales.html.

More than 90,000 workers are employed by the fish and seafood markets

JobsImpactsFMUSA
Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

Read more about the employment impacts of the Mississippi, Gulf of Mexico and United States fish and seafood markets at http://gomos.msstate.edu/msannualretailing.html.

DECLINING PER CAPITA OYSTER CONSUMPTION

The figure below shows that per capita oyster consumption of oyster products in the U.S. has considerably declined since the 1990s.

oysterpercapita
Figure 1. Apparent U.S. per capita oyster consumption. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

Read more about consumer preferences of oyster products at http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/owmroysterpubs.html.

EMPLOYMENT AND INCOME IMPACTS OF LAWN AND GARDEN EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING IN MISSISSIPPI IN THE YEARS 2001-2014

lawn&gardeneqptmftgMS
Figure 1. Direct employment impacts of the Mississippi lawn and garden equipment manufacturing. Source of raw data: EMSI (2013).

The annual trends in the number of workers directly employed in the Mississippi Lawn and Garden Tractor and Home Lawn and Garden Equipment Manufacturing industry are shown  in Figure 1. The number of jobs provided by the industry showed an upward trend since 2003 when it hit lowest at 583 jobs. The total number of workers and proprietors employed in the industry in 2014 reached 803 jobs which represent about 5.1 percent of the national total in the industry. The average state earnings in this industry in 2014 were $48,998 as compared to the national earnings averaging $46,414. As calculated by using EMSI (2014), the total employment and income impacts of this industry were 1,551 jobs and $65.88 million in the year 2012, respectively. 

 

Read more at http://coastal.msstate.edu/impactgreen.html

ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI SEAFOOD INDUSTRY IN THE YEAR 2009 BY MAJOR SPECIES

The earliest estimates of the economic impacts of the Mississippi seafood industry were prepared by the author for the PEER Committee of the Mississippi Legislature in 1991. The total direct, indirect and induced output effects of the seafood industry in 1989 were $489 million. To produce these outputs of economic goods, a broad range of supporting infrastructure provided forward and backward linkages from inside and outside of the state of Mississippi. Among others, this support infrastructure included the commercial fishing fleet, commercial processing plants, fishing docks, ice plants, fuel docks, net and gear manufacturers and repair shops, boat and motor manufacturers and repair shops, marine electronics dealers and marine supply businesses. Subsequent estimates of the economic impact of the state’s seafood industry by major species and economic sectors were prepared in 1991, 1994, and 1997 for the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources and for the oyster and shrimp harvesting and processing sectors in 2007.

Source: Posadas, Benedict C. 2014. Economic Impacts of the Mississippi Seafood Industry in the Year 2009 by Major Species. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Bulletin 1209, Mississippi State, Mississippi.

Download this MAFES publication from — http://msucares.com/pubs/bulletins/b1209.pdf.

MISSISSIPPI MARKETMAKER NEWSLETTER VOL. 4, ISSUE 12, JULY 1, 2014

MISSISSIPPI DAIRY FARMS  

Dr. Benedict Posadas and Katy Buchanan
Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Extension Program
Website: http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/MMNewsletter.html 

 

Long-term Employment Trends

JobsQ2FluidMilk2014MS

Dairy farms correspond to code 112120 or “Dairy Cattle and Milk Production” sector in the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS). This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in milking dairy cattle. However, there are no time-series data on employment for this economic sector in the Economic Modeling Specialists (EMSI) database.  As a proxy, we use NAICS code 311511 or “Fluid Milk Manufacturing” sector. This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in (1) manufacturing processed milk products, such as pasteurized milk or cream and sour cream and/or (2) manufacturing fluid milk dairy substitutes from soybeans and other nondairy substances. This dairy industry generated 371 jobs in 2014 with annual earnings averaging $44,794, about 63 percent of the national earnings of $70,925.

 

Where do you register your dairy business in Marketmaker?

If you or anyone you know wants to register in MarketMaker, please follow this link: http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/registration/register.
For assistance, go to: http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/MSMarketMaker.html.
There are 19 dairy farmsregistered or listed in Mississippi MarketMaker. 

 

Where are the dairy farms on Mississippi MarketMaker?

Brown Family Dairy
943 Hwy 334, Oxford, Mississippi 38655
Phones: 662-607-5090; 662-607-2090
MS MarketMaker Profile: http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/business/4037

Mauthe’s Progress Milk Barn
2033 Joe Tucker Rd., McComb, Mississippi 39648
Phones:601-542-3471; 985-264-7962
MS MarketMaker Profile: http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/business/797788

Covenant Creek Farm
1399 County Road 961, Belmont, Mississippi 38827
Phone: 662-454-0584
Website: http://www.covenantcreekgoatmilksoap.com
MS MarketMaker Profile: http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/business/5307.

* To find a local dairy business, do a Business Search at the MS MarketMaker website using this link!  http://webapps.foodmarketmaker.com/marketmaker/#MS/food/productsearch/2226/28.
* Expand your search to the 19 other states on MarketMaker!
* There are 772 dairy farms that are registered or listed in the 20 MarketMaker websites nationwide.                                    

 

Where can you find MarketMaker? 

MarketMaker can be viewed at – http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com.
You can follow MarketMaker at Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/MSMarketMaker.
You can also follow MarketMaker at Twitter – http://twitter.com/MS_MarketMaker 

The Mississippi MarketMaker program is funded in part through grants provided through Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission, Oil Disaster Recovery Program under NOAA Fisheries grant award number NA10NMF4770481.

 

MICROFARMING GROWING FOR FARMERS CONFERENCE

Microfarming – Growing for Farmers’ Markets Conference

Eagle Ridge Conference Center, 1500 Raymond Lake Road, Raymond, MS

August 27-28, 2014

Small farm? Locally grown? Specialty crops? If you have ever thought about selling your produce at one of Mississippi’s farmers’ markets, this conference will give you the information you need to succeed. Learn everything from the best crops to grow and best way to market your produce to how to set up your booth at a farmers’ market.

Experts from the Mississippi State University Extension Service, Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce, South Mississippi Farmers Market Association and Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries will help small-scale farmers understand the benefits and facts of selling at farmers’ markets.

Topics include fruit and vegetable variety selection, food safety, marketing and sales approaches, online presence and marketing strategies, starting a successful farmers’ market, urban farming for the local market, benefits of selling at farmers’ markets, and MDAC programs and opportunities.

The short course is free, but advance registration is required.
Attendees must mail, email, or fax reservations to confirm attendance at the workshop. There is no charge to attend. However, you MUST reserve a spot.

For more information or to register, contact Dr. Rick Snyder at Rick.Snyder@msstate.edu or 601-892-3731.

Complete information is on the website: http://farmersmarkets.msstate.edu/conference.

ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF FOOD MANUFACTURING SECTOR

JobsFoodManufactuirngMS&AL

Industries in Food Manufacturing transform livestock and agricultural products into products for intermediate or final consumption.
Read more at http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/impactsfoodmanufacturing.html.

MISSISSIPPI MARKETMAKER NEWSLETTER, VOL. 4, ISSUE 11. MISSISSIPPI FRUIT AND VEGETABLE MARKETS

Fruit and vegetable markets in Mississippi 

Fruit and Vegetable Markets correspond to code 445230 in the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS). Using Economic Modeling Specialists (EMSI) data, the fruit and vegetable market industry generated 239 jobs in 2014. The average annual earnings in 2014 are $18,924, about 64 percent of the national earnings of $29,797.

 

Why register your fruit and vegetable market in MarketMaker? 

The Mississippi MarketMaker website is visited over 75,000 times by more than 5,300 web users each month. By creating your business profile in MarketMaker, your business becomes visible to buyers and consumers who search online for local sources of food, seafood products, and tourism. You can create multiple business profiles for all your food businesses, e. g, farmer, tourism, and food retailer.

 

Where do you register your fruit and vegetable business in Marketmaker?

If you or anyone you know wants to register in MarketMaker, please follow this link:
http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/registration/register.
For assistance, go to: http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/MSMarketMaker.html.
There are 82 Fruit and Vegetable Markets and 79 Farmers Markets registered or listed in Mississippi MarketMaker. 

 

Where are the Fruit and Vegetable Markets on Mississippi MarketMaker?

Long Beach Farmer’s Market
126 Jeff Davis Ave., Long Beach, MS 39560
Phone: 228-234-8732
Website: www.realfoodgulfcoast.org
MS MarketMaker Profile:
http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/business/501832.
Eubanks Produce, Inc.
331 Produce Rd, Lucedale, Mississippi 39452
Phones: 601-947-9661; 888-219-9712
Website: www.eubanksproduce.com
MS MarketMaker Profile: http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/business/4141.
Vicksburg Farmers Market
Levee Street and Grove Street, Vicksburg, MS 39180
Phone: 601-634-9484
Website:www.vicksburgfarmersmarket.org
MS MarketMaker Profile:http://ms.foodmarketmakercom/business/420133.

* To find a local business like these, do a Business Search at the MS MarketMaker website using this link! http://webapps.foodmarketmaker.com/marketmaker/#MS/food/productsearch/22390/28.
* Expand your search to the 19 other states on MarketMaker!
* There are 6,306 Fruit and Vegetable Markets and 3,054 Farmers Markets that are registered or listed in the MarketMaker websites in 20 member states.

                                   

Where can you find MarketMaker?

MarketMaker can be viewed at – http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com.
You can follow MarketMaker at Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/MSMarketMaker.
You can also follow MarketMaker at Twitter – http://twitter.com/MS_MarketMaker 

 

The Mississippi MarketMaker program is funded in part through grants provided through Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission, Oil Disaster Recovery Program under NOAA Fisheries grant award number NA10NMF4770481.

The full and previous issues of the Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter are posted at http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/MMNewsletter.html and http://msucares.com/newsletters/marketmaker/index.html.

ECONOMIC SECTORS TARGETED BY SEA GRANT PROGRAMS

The Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium (MASGC) commits to interdisciplinary environmental scholarship and community-based natural resources management so that coastal and marine resources are conserved and managed for a sustainable economy and environment. The tools available in support of the MASGC mission are applied interdisciplinary research, communication, education, extension and legal services using both targeted and cross-cutting approaches. The U.S. industries which were targeted by the research, education, extension and outreach efforts of the MASGC during the past decade were identified using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). The NAICS economic sectors and their contributions to the economies of Mississippi and Alabama are posted at http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/msalsgpsectors.html.

RESULTS OF THE SURVEY OF MISSISSIPPI SEAFOOD RESTAURANT SECTOR

There were three objectives that this survey aimed to achieve, namely to determine the major species of seafood products handled, to determine the sources of seafood products served, and to estimate the annual gross sales and direct employment generated by the seafood restaurant sector. These results will be used in estimating the economic impacts of the Mississippi seafood restaurant sector in terms of total output, income, employment and by major species.  Updated economic impact estimates by major species are needed by the state regulatory agencies in managing these specific commercial fisheries. The results of this survey serve as benchmark information about the restaurant sector in estimating how natural or technological disasters impact the industry. The changing perceptions about local seafood arising from these disasters also have serious effects on the economic sector.  A follow-up survey is strongly recommended to determine the economic changes in the restaurant sector arising from the recent oil spill which impacted the Gulf of Mexico region.

Read the summary of the survey results at http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/restaurantsurveyresults.html

ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL TO THE MISSISSIPPI SEAFOOD AND COMMERCIAL AND SALTWATER RECREATIONAL FISHING SECTORS IN THE YEAR 2010

The results of an economic survey of the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on business operations of Mississippi seafood and commercial and saltwater recreational fishing establishments in the year 2010 are presented. These primary data establish the cause and effect relationships between the associated economic impacts in affected economic sectors and the oil spill incident. The 331 Mississippi businesses which participated in the survey accounted for 25 to 65 percent of the total annual gross sales or employment in sectors included. The oil spill-related closures of state and federal waters resulted to shut-down in business operations of participating establishments, on average, by about 4.21 months. The direct economic impacts of the oil spill resulted to a decline in 2010 by almost one-half of the annual total sales and one-third of the total employment as compared to 2009

Read the summary of the report at http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/gomosimpacts.html.

DIRECT EMPLOYMENT IMPACTS OF COMMERCIAL FISHING IN COASTAL MISSISSIPPI COUNTIES, 2001-2013

In order to understand the magnitude of the potential economic impacts of the Gulf oil spill to commercial fishing in the coastal counties, multi-year baseline economic information about the sector is compiled from various secondary sources. The Mississippi Coastal counties include Hancock, Harrison and Jackson Counties.

These long-term baseline secondary data will be used to determine the duration of the economic impacts of the massive technological disaster. Econometric analysis of these data will be conducted to determine the rate of economic recovery and measure the economic damages to these affected economic sectors.

Commercial fishing corresponds to economic sectors 114111 (Finfish Fishing) and 114112 (Shellfish Fishing) in the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS, 2014). Finfish Fishing comprises establishments primarily engaged in the commercial catching or taking of finfish (e.g., bluefish, salmon, trout, tuna) from their natural habitat. Shellfish Fishing comprises establishments primarily engaged in the commercial catching or taking of shellfish (e.g., clams, crabs, lobsters, mussels, oysters, sea urchins, shrimp) from their natural habitat.

The direct employment impacts created by the commercial fishing sector were compiled from the Economic Modeling Specialists (EMSI) website. The number of jobs includes the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) employees reported by employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed and extended proprietors.

The non-QCEW employees include military jobs, railroad jobs, many nonprofit and religious workers, certain salespersons, miscellaneous Federal Government and some other government workers. The self-employed include people who consider self-employment to be a significant part of their income or time spent working. Extended proprietors cover the same types of jobs as the “Self-Employed”, but these jobs represent miscellaneous labor income for persons who do not consider it a primary job.

 

Read the entire paper at:
Posadas, Benedict C. and Benedict Kit A. Posadas. 2014. Direct Employment Impacts of Commercial Fishing in Mississippi Coastal Counties. 2001-2013. Horticulture and Marine Economics Working Paper Series. Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center, Biloxi, Mississippi.

 

Mississippi Charter Boats for-Hire

Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Volume 4, Issue 10; May 29, 2014 

Charter boats for-hire correspond to code 487210 (Scenic and Sightseeing Transportation, Water) in the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS). About 100 charter boats for-hire are licensed by the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources (MDMR) to operate in Mississippi.  Using Economic Modeling Specialists (EMSI) data, the charter boat for-hire industry generated 137 jobs in 2014. The latest NOAA Fisheries estimates show that the Mississippi charter boats for-hire created total trip sales impacts amounting to $4.5 million in 2012.

Image

If you or anyone you know wants to register in MarketMaker, please follow this link: http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/registration/register. For registration assistance, go to: http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/MSMarketMaker.html.

There are 25 charter boats for-hire which are registered in the Mississippi MarketMaker.
About 1,002 charter boats for-hire are registered in the MarketMaker websites in 20 states.

To read the full and previous issues of the Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, go to:  http://msucares.com/newsletters/marketmaker/index.html.

 

Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts Viewer

Being able to visualize potential impacts from sea level rise is a powerful teaching and planning tool, and the Sea Level Rise Viewer brings this capability to coastal communities. A slider bar is used to show how various levels of sea level rise will impact coastal communities. Additional coastal counties will be added in the near future. Maps are not currently available for Alaska and Louisiana due to elevation data accuracy, hydraulic complexity, and vertical datum transformation gaps.

Learn more at http://csc.noaa.gov/slr/viewer/

 

Texas shrimp season scheduled to close May 15

SEAFOODNEWS.COM May 14, 2014 -

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s Coastal Fisheries division has decided to close the Gulf of Mexico commercial shrimp season in state waters starting 30 minutes after sunset on May 15.

Shrimp lovers have no need to worry: Just because the season is closing doesn’t mean a scarcity of Gulf shrimp. It does mean that at least some trawlers from the Brownsville-Port Isabel fleet will have to steam toward Louisiana waters if they want to fill their nets.

At the same time TPWD announced the closure of state waters to nine nautical miles off the coast, NMFS announced a corresponding federal waters closure.

To read the rest of Texas shrimp season scheduled to end tomorrow, Louisiana still open, please go to: http://www.seafood.com/Login.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fStory%2f928535%2f61958%2fTexas-shrimp-season-scheduled-to-end-tomorrow-Louisiana-still-open

2014 Gulf of Mexico red snapper recreational season in federal waters is 9 days

May 14, 2014      

NOAA Fisheries Announces the Revised 2014 Red Snapper Recreational Season in the Gulf of Mexico

The 2014 Gulf of Mexico red snapper recreational season in federal waters is 9 days, opening at 12:01 a.m., June 1, 2014, and closing at 12:01 a.m., on June 10, 2014. The red snapper bag limit is 2 fish with a 16-inch minimum total length size limit.

At its April 2014 meeting, the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council requested an emergency rule to revise the recreational accountability measures for red snapper by applying a 20-percent buffer to the recreational quota, which results in a recreational annual catch target of 4.312 million pounds whole weight. This emergency rule will not affect the commercial harvest of red snapper in the reef fish fishery.

The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council’s decision to request an emergency rule was made following the decision of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia in Guindon v. Pritzker, (Mar. 26, 2014). After recalculating the season length based on the annual catch target and including the 2013 Marine Recreational Information Program data, NOAA Fisheries is setting a 9-day red snapper fishing season.

The purpose of this rulemaking is to better ensure red snapper recreational landings do not exceed the recreational quota established in the rebuilding plan, in accordance with the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act and the Court’s ruling.

The method for calculating the dates for the federal season for each state are available in the Environmental Assessment in Appendix B. Electronic copies of the documents are available.

This summary is not a substitute for the actual regulations. We encourage you to read the full text of the regulations, available at

http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

FB14-034  

Cynthia Meyer
727-824-5305     

Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol 4, Issue 9: Mississippi Commercial Fish Farms

Commercial Fish and Shellfish Farming Operations

The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS, 2014) classifies commercial fish and shellfish farming in three major industries listed below:
a. Farm raising finfish – listed under NAICS code 112511 or finfish farming and fish hatcheries. This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in farm raising finfish (e.g., catfish, redfish, striped bass, tilapia, trout, snapper) and/or hatching
fish of any kind.
b. Farm raising shellfish – classified under NAICS code 112512 or shellfish farming. This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in farm raising shellfish (e.g., crayfish, saltwater shrimp, freshwater prawn, oyster, blue crab).
c. NAICS code 112519 or other aquaculture comprises establishments primarily engaged in farm raising of aquatic animals (except finfish and shellfish) and/or farm raising of aquatic plants. Alligator, algae, frog, seaweed, or turtle production is included in this industry.

Source: NAICS. North American Industry Classification System. http://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/. Last accessed: May 13, 2014.

Why register your fish farming business in MarketMaker?

The Mississippi MarketMaker website is visited over 75,000 times by more than 5,300 web users each month. By creating your business profile in MarketMaker, your business becomes visible to buyers and consumers who search online for local sources of food and seafood products. You can create multiple business profiles for all your food businesses, e. g, fish farm, fish retailer, seafood restaurant.

Read more at http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/publish/Newsletter%20051314.pdf.

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