Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol 4, Issue 8. April 22, 2014. Mississippi Commercial Fishermen

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Commercial fishing corresponds to finfish and shellfish fishing in the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS). Using Economic Modeling Specialists (EMSI) data, the commercial fishing industry directly employed 1,372 workers in 2013. Commercial fishermen earned an average of $21,935 while commercial shellfish harvester earned an average of $38,281 in 2013. The National Marine Fisheries Service estimated that Mississippi commercial fishing produced total sales impacts amounting to more than $49 million in 2011.

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For the full or previous issues of the Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, go to:

 

Mississippi commercial spotted seatrout endorsement takes effect in May 1, 2014

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The Commission on Marine Resources proposed a spotted sea trout endorsement that requires individuals harvesting spotted sea trout for sale must possess a spotted sea trout endorsement in addition to a current applicable harvester’s license. Read more at http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/troutenhance.html.

Beginning May 1, commercial fishermen will be required to obtain an endorsement along with their commercial fishing license in order to harvest spotted seatrout. – See more at:http://www.dmr.ms.gov/index.php/marine-fisheries/finfish/615-14-20-mms-2#sthash.VbLTylNB.dpuf.

The Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center assisted the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources in preparing the Economic Impact Statement of the Mississippi Spotted Sea Trout Endorsement Plan

MAFES Bulletin 1206 now available for download: License and Size Profiles of Mississippi Seafood, and Commercial and Recreational Fishing Sectors

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Posadas, Benedict C. and Benedict Kit A. Posadas, Jr. 2013. License and Size Profiles of Mississippi Seafood, and Commercial and Recreational Fishing Sectors. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Bulletin 1206, Mississippi State, Mississippi.

This bulletin deals with the license and size profiles of Mississippi seafood and marine-related sectors. The economic sectors included in the analysis are commercial fishing, charter boats for hire, live-bait boats and dealers, and seafood dealers and processors. The overall goal of these profiles is to describe the number of seafood firms and commercial and recreational fishing establishments licensed to operate in Mississippi in 2009–10. These profiles provide snapshots of the levels of effort that these establishments planned to employed in 2009–10 as compared with two baseline periods.

To download a copy, go to: http://msucares.com/pubs/bulletins/b1206.pdf

Mississippi fish and seafood processors directly employed 2,049 workers in 2013

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Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter,  Mississippi Fish and Seafood Processors. Vol. 4, Issue 7.  

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Fish and Seafood Processors in Mississippi 

The fresh and frozen fish and seafood processors correspond to code 311712 in the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS). Using Economic Modeling Specialists (EMSI) data, the Mississippi fish and seafood processors directly employed 2,049 workers in 2013. The average earnings in the industry in Mississippi were $33,550 per worker.

Why register your food and seafood business in MarketMaker?

The Mississippi MarketMaker website was visited over 75,000 times by more than 5,300 web users in 2013. By creating your business profile in MarketMaker, your business becomes visible to buyers and consumers who search online for local sources of food and seafood products. Source: http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/MSMarketMakerImpact.html.

Who are Seafood Processors on Mississippi MarketMaker?

There are 34 processors or packing sheds of fish/shellfish/seafood products listed at the Mississippi MarketMaker.  To find local fish and seafood processors, do a “business search” at the Mississippi MarketMaker website using this link: http://webapps.foodmarketmaker.com/marketmaker/#MS/food/productsearch/19069/28.  You can expand your “business search” by including in your search the other 19 states which are members of MarketMaker.

For the full text and previous issues of the MS-MM Newsletter, go to: http://msucares.com/newsletters/marketmaker/index.html.

Mississippi seafood restaurants created $107 million total sales impacts and provided jobs to 3,500 workers

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Mississippi seafood restaurants created $107 million total sales impacts and provided jobs to 3,500 workers in 2009. There are 5,952 restaurants listed in the Mississippi MarketMaker. Seafood restaurants are a staple of the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

From raw oysters, seafood poboys, and boiled shrimp our cuisine is sure to leave you wanting more! Stop by one of our local restaurants and taste for yourself! To find a local seafood restaurant, do a Business Search at the Mississippi MarketMaker website: http://webapps.foodmarketmaker.com/marketmaker/#MS/food/productsearch/15926/28. You can expand your business search by including in your search the other 19 states which are members of MarketMaker.

Read more about Mississippi Seafood Restaurants at http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/MMNewsletter.html.

 

Gulf FINFO website profiles top Gulf of Mexico States marine fisheries

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Gulf FINFO profiles top Gulf fisheries, with information ranging from basics about species biology and habitat to how fisheries operate and how each state ensures these operations are sustainable. Through FINFO, users can quickly review the status of Gulf fisheries resources or dig deeper to understand the robust science and responsible management at work to ensure these resources are viable for generations to come.

Read more at http://gulffishinfo.org/.

Funding for fruits and vegetables and organic programs increased in the 2014 farm bill

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The NY Times reports that within the 2014 farm bill is a significant shift in the types of farmers who are now benefiting from taxpayer dollars, reflecting a decade of changing eating habits and cultural dispositions among American consumers. Organic farmers, fruit growers and hemp producers all did well in the new bill. While traditional commodities subsidies were cut by more than 30 percent to $23 billion over 10 years, funding for fruits and vegetables and organic programs increased by more than 50 percent over the same period, to about $3 billion.

Read more at http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/09/us/politics/farm-bill-reflects-shifting-american-menu-and-a-senators-persistent-tilling.html?_r=1.

Mississippi Fish and Seafood Wholesalers

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Employment Impacts of Fish and Seafood Wholesalers

Using the Economic Modeling Specialists (EMSI) data, the Mississippi fish and seafood merchant wholesalers (424460) directly employed 151 workers in 2013. With a job multiplier of 1.53, the industry created 232 jobs in Mississippi in 2013 and generated $7.9 million total earnings. The average earnings in the industry in Mississippi were $33,397 per worker as compared to the national average earnings $50,810 per worker.

 Why register your food and seafood business in MarketMaker? 

The Mississippi MarketMaker website was visited over 75,000 times by more than 5,300 web users during the past twelve months. By creating your business profile in MarketMaker, your business becomes visible to buyers and consumers who search online for local sources of food and seafood products.

Read more at http://msucares.com/newsletters/marketmaker/index.html.

Commercial fishing industry directly employs more than 400 jobs in Jackson County, Mississippi

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Source of raw data: EMSI (2014).

The direct employment impacts created by the commercial fishing sector were compiled from the Economic Modeling Specialists (EMSI, 2014) website. The number of jobs includes the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) employees reported by employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed and extended proprietors. The non-QCEW employees include military jobs, railroad jobs, many nonprofit and religious workers, certain salespersons, miscellaneous Federal Government and some other government workers. The self-employed include people who consider self-employment to be a significant part of their income or time spent working. Extended proprietors cover the same types of jobs as the “Self-Employed”, but these jobs represent miscellaneous labor income for persons who do not consider it a primary job.

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/gomosreports.html.

Gulf softshell blue crab landings are now down to about 32,000 pounds

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The scientific name of blue crab is Callinectes sapidus. The NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office reports that blue crabs must shed their hard carapace shell in order to grow, and experienced crabbers can quickly spot signs that the crab is about to molt. These ‘peeler’ crabs are held for a short time in shedding tanks until they molt. After molting, the soft-shell crabs are removed from the water and sold. These shedding tanks are monitored continuously through the day and night.

The suppliers of blue crabs registered in MarketMaker can be found by clicking this link – http://webapps.foodmarketmaker.com/marketmaker/#MS/food/productsearch/22695/28. There are 36 seafood businesses registered in five Gulf of Mexico MarketMaker member states.

Read more about Gulf softshell blue crab landings and values at http://gomos.msstate.edu/gomosreports.html.

Hiring Preferences of Nurseries and Greenhouses in U.S. Southern States

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Hiring Preferences of Nurseries and Greenhouses in U.S. Southern States
Benedict C. Posadas, Patricia R. Knight, Christine E.H. Coker, Randal Y. Coker, and Scott A. Langlois. HortTechnology, February 2014 24:107-117.

This work describes workers’ socioeconomic characteristics and evaluates the determinants of workers hiring decisions among 215 randomly selected wholesale nurseries and greenhouses located in eight selected southern states in the United States. The participating nurseries and greenhouses employed on average 5.40 permanent workers per horticulture operation or 2.27 permanent workers per acre under cultivation. Participating nurseries and greenhouses hired an average 2.38 part-time workers per horticulture operation or 0.80 part-time workers per acre placed under production. Empirical models were estimated to determine the significant factors affecting hiring decisions by this industry. Hiring decision models covered age groups, racial backgrounds, formal education levels, and gender.

Mississippi awarded about $11 million for fisheries disaster

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Nearly $11 million in federal money will help restore oyster and blue crab fisheries in Mississippi. Both were declared disasters following a 2011 season ruined by freshwater from the opening of the Bonnet Carre spillway. Read more at http://www.wlox.com/story/24842216/ms-to-get-109-million-to-revive-oyster-and-crab-fisheries.

The Mississippi State University is glad to assist the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources in the application process for the fisheries disaster assistance in 2011. The prolonged exposure of the Mississippi oyster growing areas to freshwater intrusion due to the opening of the Bonnet Carré Spillway during the Mississippi River flooding event of 2011 resulted to massive mortalities of the state oyster populations. These massive mortalities created economic hardships in the state’s oyster harvesting sector and its backwardly- and forwardly-linked economic sectors.  The rapid economic recovery of the oyster sector required immediate restoration efforts to replenish the damaged resources. Read more at http://coastal.msstate.edu/oysterbonnetcarre.html.

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) Vegetable Businesses in Mississippi

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Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter Vol. 4, Issue 4
Community Supported Agriculture 

In CSA arrangements, growers invite a set number of customers to invest by buying shares in exchange for a predetermined amount of produce provided over a set period of time. Advantages for farmers include cash flow early in the season to help offset expenses, a guaranteed outlet for products, and an opportunity to market their produce before they begin spending long days in the field. Satisfied customers become repeat clients and provide priceless word-of-mouth advertising. For more information about CSA, visit: http://msucares.com/neighbors/csa/. There are 17 CSA vegetable growers who are registered in Mississippi MarketMaker, as shown in the map. MS-MM-CSA

To read the full issue and the previous issues of the Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, go to:
http://msucares.com/newsletters/marketmaker/index.html
and 
http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/MMNewsletter.html. 

Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter Vol. 4, No. 3. Mississippi Fish and Seafood Markets!

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Employment Impacts of Fish and Seafood Markets

The fish and seafood markets correspond to NAICS code 445220 in the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS).  This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in retailing fresh, frozen, or cured fish and seafood products.  Using Economic Modeling Specialists (EMSI) data, the Mississippi fish and seafood markets directly employed 183 workers in 2013. With a job multiplier of 1.27, the industry created 233 jobs in Mississippi in 2013 and generated $5.3 million total earnings. The average earnings in the industry in Mississippi were $19,737 per worker as compared to the national average earnings $31,897 per worker.

Why register your food and seafood business in MarketMaker?

A survey was conducted by Clemson University in 2011-2012 to evaluate the impact of MarketMaker websites on agricultural producers and farmers’ markets. Survey respondents reported that the increase in sales associated with MarketMaker was estimated at about $152 per year. Producers’ participation in the MarketMaker network brought additional 2.9 times contacts by customers, suppliers and other producers. These additional business contacts resulted to additional 1.6 new customers.

Read more at http://www.coastal.msstate.edu/MMNewsletter.html.

Scott Corey, the ultimate photographer

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Scott Corey, the ultimate photographer

Mr. Scott Allen Corey
Senior Extension Associate
Agricultural Communications
Mississippi State University

Scott Corey, the ultimate photographer will be missed down here at the Coastal Research and Extension Center.
Through his photographic lens, he helped document the impacts of the recent natural and technological disasters that devastated the coastal areas of the state.
He kept coming back and compiled photographic records of the phases of recovery of the adversely affected areas and infrastructures.
I enjoyed a few but deep conversations with him.
May our mighty Creator take you in your rightful place in His Kingdom, Scott.

Declining ratios of Gulf of Mexico region to total United States commercial landing values and prices

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Declining ratios of Gulf of Mexico region to total United States commercial landing values and prices

LEGENDS:
pounds (blue bar) – ratio of Gulf to total USA commercial landings slightly went down from 0.20 in 2000 to 0.18 in 2012.
dollars (red bar) – ratio of Gulf to total USA commercial landing values significantly fell from 0.27 in 2000 to 0.15 in 2012.
evp (green line) – ratio of Gulf to total USA average landing or ex-vessel prices greatly declined from 1.38 in 2000 to 0.84 in 2012.

Source or raw data – NOAA Fisheries.