AVERAGE PRODUCTIVITY OF COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN, 2000-2016

productivity-average-fisherman-MS

Sources of raw data: NOAA Fisheries and EMSI.
Legend: lbs/worker = commercial landings (lbs) / no. of commercial fishermen; $/worker1 = commercial landing values ($) / no. of commercial fishermen; $/worker2 = commercial landing values ($/CPI) / no. of commercial fishermen.

productivity-average-fisherman-USA

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MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM SEPTEMBER 1995 TO SEPTEMBER 2017

ShrimpLandingsALSeptemberShrimpLandingsMSSeptemberShrimpLandingsGulfSeptember

Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html 

MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM AUGUST 1995 TO AUGUST 2017

ShrimpLandingsMSAugustShrimpLandingsGulfAugust

Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html  

MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM JULY 1995 TO JULY 2017

ShrimpLandingsGulfJulyShrimpLandingsMSJuly

Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html  

U.S. per capita seafood consumption, 1950-2016

per-capita-seafood-consumption
Annual per capita consumption of seafood products represents the pounds of edible meat consumed from domestically-caught and imported fish and shellfish adjusted for beginning and ending inventories and exports, divided by the civilian population of the United States as of July 1 of each year.  NOAA Fisheries (2017).

MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM JUNE 1995 TO JUNE 2017

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Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html  

MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM MAY 1995 TO MAY 2017

 

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Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html 

MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM APRIL 1995 TO APRIL 2017

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Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html  

MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM MARCH 1995 TO MARCH 2017

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Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html 

Monthly Shrimp Landings in the Gulf of Mexico from February 1996 to February 2017

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Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html 

Monthly Gulf of Mexico States Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices from January 2013 to September 2017

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Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaeid species only, headless.  Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;  Northern – Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana;  Western – Texas; Count – the number of shrimp per pound.

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-prices.html

Monthly Shrimp Landings in the Gulf of Mexico from January 1995 to January 2017

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Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html 

Distribution of Seafood Processing Workers by Age

The 2016 industrial overview published by EMSI (October 2017) also classified the seafood processing workers and owners in the United States by age. More than 1 out of 4 of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The 45-55 years old seafood processing workers and owners consisted of 26.5 percent of the total. The 35-44 years old group added 20.4 percent of the total. More than 1 out of 4 of the workers and owners are below 35 years old. The age grouping of the seafood processing workers and owners in the Gulf States are similar to that of the national breakdown.

 

Proccesing-Workers-Age--USA-GOM

Distribution of Seafood Processing QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Age. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

How many women are working in seafood processing in the Gulf of Mexico and the United States?

The 2016 industrial overview released by EMSI (October 2017) showed that among seafood processing workers and owners in the United States, approximately 64.1 percent were males. About 35.9 percent of the seafood processing workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, relatively more females worked in seafood processing plants.

 

Proccesing-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM

Distribution of Seafood Processing QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Gender. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

How many are working in seafood processing in the Gulf of Mexico and United States and how much are they earning?

The seafood processing industry directly provided more than 42,000 jobs per year in the United States since 2001. The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 25.7 percent of all the seafood processing jobs during the period. The seafood processing activities in Mississippi and Alabama added 7.3 and 4.2 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

Processing-Workers-Wages-USA

The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2016 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors in the United States averaged more than $41,000 per person during the past 16 years. The annual pay of workers and owners of seafood processing businesses in the five Gulf of Mexico States averaged more than $31,000 per person or 76.8 percent of the national average. Mississippi and Alabama seafood processing workers and owners received average annual pay equivalent to 60.0 and 63.1 percent of the national average, respectively.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Distribution of Commercial Fishermen by Age

The 2016 industrial overview published by EMSI (October 2017) classified the fishers and owners by age.  Almost 3 out of 10 of the fishermen and owners are 55 years old and above. The 45-55 years old fishers and owners consisted of 29.9 percent of the total. The 35-44 years old group added 21.1 percent of the total. The younger fishermen and owners comprised the rest of the fishermen and owners. The commercial fishermen in the Gulf States are relatively older than the national average.

Fishermen-Age--USA-GOM

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker/2017/vol-7-no-18-commercial-fishing-employment-and-incomes.

Distribution of Commercial Fishermen by Race or Ethnicity

The 2016 industrial overview disseminated by EMSI categorized fishers and owners by race or ethnicity. Majority of the workers are Whites (81%), followed by Asians (7.5%), and Native Americans or Alaska Native (5.9%). The rest are Hispanic or Latino (2.4%), African Americans (1%), with two or more races (2%), and Native Hawaiians or Pacific Islander (0.2%).  In the Gulf States, relatively more Asians are engaged in commercial fishing.

Fishermen-Race--USA-GOM

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker/2017/vol-7-no-18-commercial-fishing-employment-and-incomes
.

Distribution of Commercial Fishermen by Gender

The 2016 industrial overview released by EMSI (October 2017) showed that among fishers and owners, approximately 93.2 percent were males. About 6.8 percent of the fishing workers and boat owners were females. In the Gulf States, 92.4 percent are males while 7.6 percent are females.

Fishermen-Gender--USA-GOM

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker/2017/vol-7-no-18-commercial-fishing-employment-and-incomes.

Commercial Fishing Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

Fishermen-Wages-USAFigure 1. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of Commercial Fishing QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.  Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

 

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook (https://www.bls.gov/ooh/farming-fishing-and-forestry/fishers-and-related-fishing-workers.htm), fishers and related fishing workers typically do the following tasks:

  1. Locate fish with the use of fish-finding equipment
  2. Direct fishing operations and supervise the crew of fishing vessels
  3. Steer vessels and operate navigational instruments
  4. Maintain engines, fishing gear, and other onboard equipment by making minor repairs
  5. Sort, pack and store the catch in holds with ice and other freezing methods
  6. Measure fish to ensure that they are of legal size
  7. Return undesirable or illegal catches to the water
  8. Guide nets, traps, and lines onto vessels by hand or with hoisting equipment
  9. Signal other workers to move, hoist, and position loads of the catch

The commercial fishing industry directly provided more than 86,000 jobs per year in the United States all the way through the past 17 years (Figure 1).  The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 27.4 percent of all the fishing jobs during the period. The fishing activities in Mississippi and Alabama added 1.4 and 1.6 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2016 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged more than $33,000 per person during the past 16 years (Figure 1). The annual pay of fishers and owners of fishing businesses in the five Gulf of Mexico States averaged more than $23,000 per person or 78.9 percent of the national average. Mississippi and Alabama commercial fishers and boat owners received average annual pay amounting to 92.4 and 73.4 percent of the national average, respectively.

Most valued species commercially landed in the Gulf of Mexico States

Commercial fishing comprises establishments primarily engaged in the commercial catching or taking of finfish, shellfish, or miscellaneous marine products from a natural habitat. (U.S. Bureau of Census, https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html). The most valued species commercially landed in the Gulf of Mexico States are shrimp, menhaden, oyster, blue crabs, spiny lobster, red snapper, red grouper, and others listed in Figure 1.

Species-Million-Values-GOM.jpgFigure 1. Most Valued Species Commercial Harvested in the Gulf of Mexico States Exceeding $1 Million in 2015. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/commercial-fisheries/index.