Economic Contributions of Commercial Yellowfin Tuna Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

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Figure 1. Yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares). Source: Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Service. Last visited: September 14, 2018. https://www.freshfromflorida.com/es/Divisions-Offices/Marketing-and-Development/Consumer-Resources/Buy-Fresh-From-Florida/Seafood-Products/Yellowfin-Tuna.

 

The long-term annual commercial yellowfin tuna landings in the Gulf of Mexico states are shown in Fig. 2. Since 2011, the Gulf supplied 8% of the total yellowfin tuna domestic landings averaging 1.7 million pounds and valued at $6.4 million annually. In 2016, Louisiana (13.9%) and Florida West Coast (4.5%) were the most significant suppliers from the Gulf of Mexico. The bulk of the Yellowfin tuna was landed in Hawaii (56.8%). California landed 9.8%, and North Carolina added 8.0% to domestic landings. Dockside prices of Yellowfin tuna in the Gulf of Mexico states averaged about $3.87 per pound during the past six years.

yellowtail-tuna-landings-year-gom
Figure 2. Commercial landings and dockside values of yellowfin tuna in the Gulf of Mexico region. The primary vertical axis shows the yearly commercial landings in pounds while the secondary vertical axis indicates the annual commercial dockside values in dollars. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: September 14, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

 

The economic contribution that the commercial Yellowfin tuna fishing makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used in creating the regional economic model of commercial fishing in the Gulf of Mexico in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of Yellowfin tuna in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $5.6 million, which was 14.6% less than the average yearly dockside values in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial Yellowfin tuna fishing in 2016 amounted to $10.7 million (Fig. 3). This output of goods and service created by the Yellowfin tuna commercial fishing and related industries sustained 149 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $3.8 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The Yellowfin tuna commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. More than $657,000 was projected to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to more than $320,000 as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

 

Tuna-yellowfin-Gulf-economic-contribution
Figure 3. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2016 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set at 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

For more information, go to:

Posadas, Benedict C., and Amanda E. Jefferson. Commercial yellowfin tuna fishing in the Gulf of Mexico states. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 14, September 24, 2018. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

 

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Economic Contribution of Commercial Gag Grouper Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

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Figure 1. Gag grouper (Mycteroperca microlepis). Illustration by Joe Jewell. Mississippi Saltwater Fish. Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, Biloxi, Mississippi.

Commercial Landings

The long-term commercial gag grouper landings in the Gulf of Mexico states are shown in Fig. 2. Since 2011, the Gulf of Mexico states supplied about 63 percent of the total gag grouper domestic landings. The east and west coasts of Florida supplied about 72 percent of the total domestic landings during the past six years. Fig. 3 shows the average dockside prices of gag grouper in the Gulf of Mexico.

landings-year-gag-grouper-gom
Figure 2. The primary vertical axis shows the yearly commercial landings in pounds while the secondary vertical axis indicates the annual commercial dockside values in dollars. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: August 30, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

evp-year-gag-grouper-gom
Figure 3. The vertical axis shows the average yearly dockside prices (deflated by the consumer price index) in dollars per pound. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: August 30, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

Economic Contributions

The economic contribution commercial gag grouper fishing makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of gag grouper in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $4.7 million, which was 88% more than the average yearly dockside values in the region from 2011 to 2015. The total output contribution of commercial Gag grouper fishing in 2016 amounted to $9.0 million (Fig. 4). This output of goods and service created by the gag grouper commercial fishing and related industries sustained 126 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $3.2 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The gag grouper commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. More than $548,000 was projected to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to almost $268,000 as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Gag-grouper-Gulf-economic-contribution
Figure 4. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2016 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set at 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

For more information, go to:

Posadas, Benedict C., and Amanda E. Jefferson. Commercial gag grouper fishing in the Gulf of Mexico states. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 13, August 30, 2018. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

July shrimp dockside prices in the Gulf of Mexico region from 1995 to 2018

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The prices shown above are official data from NOAA Fisheries. The charts show the dockside prices of various shrimp products landed in the five Gulf of Mexico states from Jan. 2013 to July 2018. The vertical or Y-axis shows the ex-vessel prices expressed in dollars per pound of headless shrimp. The ex-vessel prices of shrimp products in heads-on forms are much lower than those reported prices. You need the yield ratio from heads on to headless forms in order to convert those prices. The horizontal or X-axis shows the month and year the shrimp products were landed.

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All prices are in dollars per pound. Penaeid species only, headless. The source of raw data is the NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. The following legends are used: Eastern – Florida West Coast (no recent price data are available), Northern – Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and Western – Texas, and Count – the number of shrimps per pound.

July shrimp landings in the Gulf of Mexico region from 1995 to 2018

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Around 7.9 million pounds (headless) of all Penaeid shrimp species were landed in all five Gulf of Mexico states in July 2018, which was 19 percent less than the average landings since after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The July shrimp landings in the entire Gulf region since 2011 averaged 9.7 million pounds. The landings shown above are official data from NOAA Fisheries. The charts show the July landings of various shrimp products in the five Gulf of Mexico states from July 1995 to July 2018. The vertical or Y-axis shows the number of pounds of shrimp landed expressed in pounds of headless shrimp. The pounds of shrimp products in heads-on forms are much higher than those reported pounds. You need the yield ratio from heads-on to headless forms in order to convert those values. The horizontal or X-axis shows the year the shrimp products were landed.

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Around 0.487 million pounds (headless) of all Penaeid shrimp species were landed in Mississippi in July 2018, which was 40 percent less than the average landings since after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The July shrimp landings in Mississippi since 2011 averaged 0.807 million pounds.

shrimp-alabama

Around 2.177 million pounds (headless) of all Penaeid shrimp species were landed in Alabama in July 2018, which was 108 percent more than the average landings since after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The July shrimp landings in Alabama since 2011 averaged 1.045 million pounds.

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Around 1.269 million pounds (headless) of all Penaeid shrimp species were landed in Louisiana in July 2018, which was 64 percent less than the average landings since after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The July shrimp landings in Louisiana since 2011 averaged 3.55 million pounds.

shrimp-tx

Around 3.865 million pounds (headless) of all Penaeid shrimp species were landed in Texas in July 2018, which was 4 percent less than the average landings since after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The July shrimp landings in Texas since 2011 averaged 4.015 million pounds.

shrimp-flwc

Around 0.126 million pounds (headless) of all Penaeid shrimp species were landed in Florida West Coast in July 2018, which was 64 percent less than the average landings since after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The July shrimp landings in Florida West Coast since 2011 averaged 0.352 million pounds. 

Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless).
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting.

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landings-monthly-July.html.

Crawfish Fishing Makes Significant Contributions to the Gulf Regional Economy

Gulf Commercial Landings Provided Eight Percent of Total Domestic Crawfish Supply

The long-term annual commercial crawfish landings in the Gulf of Mexico states are shown in Fig. 1. Since 2011, Louisiana supplied 100% of the entire domestic crawfish landings averaging 11.8 million pounds and valued at $11.9 million annually.

Crawfish-annual-landings-GoM
Figure 1. Annual commercial crawfish landings in the Gulf of Mexico states. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

The apparent equation for the crawfish supply in the United States is expressed as follows: Total supply = domestic landings + domestic farm production+ imports – exports. Fig. 2 shows the long-term commercial landings and farm production of crawfish. Since 2011, the total landings and production of domestic crawfish averaged 130 million pounds per year with dockside and farm-gate value averaging $188 million per year. The contribution of commercial landings to total domestic pounds averaged about 8 percent with the remaining more significant portion (92%) coming from crawfish ponds mostly in Louisiana and some in Texas.

Crawfish-annual-landings-production-USA
Figure 2. Annual commercial crawfish landings and farm production in the United States. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

Crawfish Dockside Prices Versus Farm-gate Prices

The imputed annual crawfish prices at the dockside and farm-gate levels are shown in Fig. 3. These prices are deflated by the consumer price index (CPI) with 2016 as the base year. Since 2011, the imputed annual prices for the crawfish at the dockside level averaged $1.11 per pound. The imputed farm-gate prices of farmed crawfish averaged $1.55 per pound. These price differentials between wild and farmed crawfish are significant, averaging 40 percent during the past five years.

Crawfish-annual-dockside-farmgate-prices-USA
Figure 3. Imputed annual dockside and farm-gate prices of commercial crawfish harvest and farm production in the United States. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

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Figure 4. Annual commercial crawfish dockside values in the Gulf of Mexico States. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

Seafood Businesses that are Registered in MarketMaker

In 2016, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of crawfish reached 13.6 million pounds with dockside values of $11.9 million. Crawfish are harvested from the wild during spring months (Fig. 5). Farmed crawfish are typically harvested from late fall to spring.

Crawfish-monthly-landings-GoM
Figure 5. Monthly commercial crawfish landings in the Gulf of Mexico states. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

Economic Contributions to the Gulf Regional Economy

The economic contribution that commercial crawfish fishing makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The total commercial dockside value of crawfish harvested in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $11.9 million, which was about the average yearly dockside value in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial crawfish fishing in 2016 amounted to $22.7 million (Fig. 6). The commercial crawfish fishing supported 315 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $8.1 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The crawfish commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf states and the U.S. federal government. More than $1.3 million was projected to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf of Mexico states were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to almost $680,000 as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Crawfish-fishing-economic-contribution-GoM
Figure 6. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2016 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set at 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

Read more at Posadas, Benedict C., and Amanda E. Jefferson. Commercial crawfish fishing in the Gulf of Mexico states. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 11, July 25, 2018. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Charter Boat for-Hire in the Gulf of Mexico and United States

Definition of Charter Boat for-Hire

Scenic and Sightseeing Transportation, Water (NAICS 487210) code includes charter boat for-hire (https://www.naics.com/). The “Scenic and Sightseeing Transportation, Water” industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing scenic and sightseeing transportation on water. The services provided are usually local and involve same-day return to the place of origin. Some illustrative examples include airboat (i.e., swamp buggy) operation, excursion boat operation, charter fishing boat services, harbor sightseeing tours, dinner cruises.”

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

The industry directly created, on average, 21,868 jobs per year in the United States since 2001 (Figure 1). All the Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 23 percent of all the jobs during the period. The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.5 and 0.7 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged $35,937 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1). The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged $35,927 per person or 99.9 percent of the national average. During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 78.3 and 77 percent of the national average, respectively.

U.S. Employment & Wages, Salaries & Earnings in Charter Boats for-Hire
Figure 1. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

 

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Jan. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 65.6 percent were males (Figure 2). About 34.4 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, relatively more men owned and worked at these businesses.

Socio-demographic Characteristics of workers and owners of charter boats for-hire.
Figure 2. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Gender. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

 

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Jan. 2018) also grouped workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 3). Majority of the workers and owners are White (74%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (10.7%), and African American (7.6%). In the Gulf States, relatively more White, Hispanic and African American, and fewer Asian are engaged in these businesses.

Socio-demographic characteristics of workers and owners of charter boats for-hire.
Figure 3. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Race or Ethnicity. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com

 

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview published by EMSI (Jan. 2018) also classified workers and owners by age (Figure 4). More than three out of 10 of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The 45-55 years old workers and owners consisted of 15.9 percent of the total. The 35-44 years old group added 18.4 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners comprise 35.1 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are relatively older than the national average.

Socio-demographic characteristics of Workers and owners of charter boats for-hire.
Figure 4. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Age. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Fruit and Vegetable Canning, Pickling, and Drying Businesses

Definition of Fruit and Vegetable Canning, Pickling, and Drying

Fruit and vegetable canning, pickling, and drying (NAICS 31142) include “establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing canned, pickled, and dried fruits, vegetables, and specialty foods. Establishments in this industry may package the dried or dehydrated ingredients they make with other purchased ingredients. Examples of products are canned juices; canned baby foods; canned soups (except seafood); canned dry beans; canned tomato-based sauces, such as catsup, salsa, chili sauce, spaghetti sauce, barbeque sauce, and tomato paste; pickles and relishes; jams and jellies; dried soup mixes and bouillon; and sauerkraut.” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html)

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

The overall trend in the number of jobs in the industry has been downward. On average the industry directly created more than 91,000 jobs per year in the United States since 2001 (Figure 1). All the Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 9.3 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 2). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.24 and 0.17 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States has been slowly rising over the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged $61,544 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1).

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been declining more frequently during the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged $63,776 per person or 103.7 percent of the national average (Figure 2). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 62.7 and 62.4 percent of the national average, respectively.

Fruits-Vegetables-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Fruits-Vegetables-Workers-Wages-GOM

Figure 2. Gulf of Mexico Region Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Feb. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 61.6 percent were males (Figure 3). About 38.4 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, relatively more men and fewer women worked and owned these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Canning-Pickling-Drying-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 3. Gender Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

 Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Feb. 2018) also grouped workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 4). The majority of the workers and owners are White (57%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (29.5%), and African American (8.3%). In the Gulf States, relatively more African American, and fewer White, Hispanic, and Asian people are employed in these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Canning-Pickling-Drying-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 4. Race or Ethnic Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview published by EMSI (Feb. 2018) also classified workers and owners by age (Figure 5). Almost three out of 10 of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners consisted of 26.7 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 20.1 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners comprise 23.8 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are relatively older than the national average.

Fruit-Vegetable-Canning-Pickling-Drying-Workers-Age--USA-GOMFigure 5. Age Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Merchant Wholesalers

Definition of Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Merchant Wholesalers

Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Merchant Wholesalers (NAICS 424480) “comprise establishments primarily engaged in the wholesale merchant distribution of fresh fruits and vegetables” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html).

Examples of establishments listed by the Bureau of Census includes the following:

  • Berries, fresh, merchant wholesalers;
  • Fresh fruits, vegetables, and berries merchant wholesalers;
  • Fruits, fresh, merchant wholesalers;
  • Health foods, fresh fruits, and vegetables, merchant wholesalers;
  • Produce, fresh, merchant wholesalers;
  • Salads, prepackaged, merchant wholesalers; and
  • Vegetables, fresh, merchant wholesalers.”

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

Fruits-Vegetables-Wholesalers-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

The number of jobs in the industry has been trending upward. On average, the industry directly created more than 89,000 jobs per year in the United States since 2001 (Figure 1). The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 17.4 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 2). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.38 and 0.53 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States have been slowly rising during the later part of the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged $56,400 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1).

Fruits-Vegetables--Wholesalers-Workers-Wages-GOM
Figure 2. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been slowly increasing during the later part of the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged $51,630 per person or 91.5 percent of the national average (Figure 2). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 78.7 and 82.2 percent of the national average, respectively.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Feb. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 71.9 percent were males (Figure 3). About 28.1 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, relatively more men and fewer women worked and owned these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Merchant-Wholesalers-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 3. Gender Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Feb. 2018) also grouped workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 4). The majority of the workers and owners are White (54.6%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (27.5%), African American (9.7%), and Asian (6.6%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer White, (46.6%) and Asian (3.2%), more Hispanic (33.9%) and African American (15.3%) people are working in these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Merchant-Wholesalers-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 4. Race or Ethnic Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview published by EMSI (Feb. 2018) also classified workers and owners by age (Figure 5). Almost one out of 4 of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners comprised of 26.1 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 23.1 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners comprise 27.3 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States have similar age distribution.

Fruit-Vegetable-Merchant-Wholesalers-Workers-Age--USA-GOM
Figure 5. Age Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Fruit and Vegetable Markets in the Gulf of Mexico and the United States

Definition of Fruit and Vegetable Markets

Fruit and vegetable markets (NAICS 445230) “comprise establishments primarily engaged in retailing fresh fruits and vegetables” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html). Examples of establishments listed by the Bureau of Census includes the following:

  • Fruit and vegetable stands, permanent
  • Fruit markets
  • Fruit stands, permanent
  • Produce markets
  • Produce stands, permanent
  • Vegetable markets

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

Table 1 shows the number of jobs in the entire industry since 2001. On average, the industry directly created about 54,000 jobs per year in the United States. Figure 2 shows the top 10 states which provided jobs in the fruit and vegetable markets in 2017. The state of New York topped the list contributing 13.7% of all the jobs in the industry and followed closely by the state of California with 12.8 percent of all the industry jobs.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States have been falling during most of the early part of the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged more than $35,000 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1).

Fruits-Vegetables--Markets-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Top-10-states-jobs-fruit-vegetable-markets-USA
Figure 2. The top 10 states in fruit and vegetable markets by percent of jobs in 2017.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed more than 7,700 jobs or 14.41 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 3). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.43 and 1.20 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been decreasing during most of the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged about $34,800 per person (at constant 2017 prices) or 98.26 percent of the national average (Figure 3). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 63.13 and 82.38 percent of the national average, respectively.

Fruits-Vegetables--Markets-Workers-Wages-GOM
Figure 3. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Mar. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 54,2 percent were males (Figure 4). About 45.8 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, similar proportions of men and women worked and owned these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Markets-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 4. Gender Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Mar. 2018) sorted workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 5). The majority of the workers and owners are White (63.3%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (20.4%), African American (8.1%), and Asian (6.7%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer White (57.0%), African American (7.9%), and Asian (5.5%) and more Hispanic (28.6%) people are working in these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Markets-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 5. Race or Ethnic Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.  Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview circulated by EMSI (Mar. 2018) grouped workers and owners by age (Figure 6). About 22.8 percent of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners involved 19.6 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 18.7 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners included 21.3 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are slightly older (41.79 years) as compared to the national average (40.51 years).

Fruit-Vegetable-Markets-Workers-Age--USA-GOM
Figure 6. Age Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Florists in the Gulf of Mexico and the United States

Definition of Florists

 Florists (NAICS 453110) “comprise establishments primarily engaged in retailing cut flowers, floral arrangements, and potted plants purchased from others. These establishments usually prepare the arrangements they sell.” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html).

Florists-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual employment and wages, salaries, and earnings of QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

Figure 1 shows the annual number of jobs in the florist industry which had been declining since 2001. On average, the florist industry directly created more than 140.000 jobs per year in the United States. Figure 2 shows the top 10 states which provided jobs in the florist industry in 2017. The state of California topped the list contributing 11.87% of all the jobs in the industry and followed by the state of Texas with 8.19 percent of all the industry jobs.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States have been falling during most of the early part of the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged more than $24,500 per person during the entire period (Figure 1).

Top-10-states-jobs-florists-USA
Figure 2. U.S. top 10 states in fruit and vegetable markets by percent of jobs in 2017.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed more than 24,800 jobs or 17.51 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 3). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 1.19 and 1.89 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been fluctuating during the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged about $24,000 per person (at constant 2017 prices) or 97.96 percent of the national average (Figure 3). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 83.11 and 81.69 percent of the national average, respectively.

Florists-Workers-Wages-GOM
Figure 3. Annual employment and wages, salaries, and earnings of QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Mar. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 28.6 percent were males (Figure 4). Majority of the workers and owners were females (71.4%). In the Gulf States, similar proportions of men and women worked and owned these businesses.

Florists-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 4. Gender distribution of QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Mar. 2018) sorted workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 5). The majority of the workers and owners are White (81.2%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (12.9%), African American (2.5%), and Asian (2.0%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer White (72.4%) and Asian (0.8%) and more Hispanic (21.4%) and African American (4.8%) people are working in these businesses.

Florists-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 5. Race or ethnic distribution of QCEW Employees, non-QCEW Employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors.  Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview circulated by EMSI (Mar. 2018) grouped workers and owners by age (Figure 6). About 43.7 percent of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners involved 20.7 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 16.5 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners included 19.0 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are slightly younger (48.44 years) as compared to the national average (48.86 years).

Florists-Workers-Age--USA-GOM
Figure 6. Age distribution of QCEW Employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker. 

Economic Contribution of Commercial Red Grouper Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

According to NOAA Fisheries (https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/species/red-grouper), the red grouper (Epinephelus morio) fishery in the Gulf of Mexico is sustainably managed and responsibly harvested under U.S. regulations. Red-grouper-NOAA-Fisheries
Figure 1. Red grouper (Epinephelus morio). Also known as Grouper, Cherna americana, and Negre. Source: FishWatch (https://www.fishwatch.gov/profiles/red-grouper).

The species’ range extends from New England south to Florida and throughout the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean. Like other grouper species, red grouper are protogynous hermaphrodites: they begin their lives as females, and some transform into males when they reach the ages of 7-15.

Commercial fishermen must have a permit to fish, land, or sell red grouper. Managers limit the number of available permits to control the number of fishermen harvesting red grouper. There are annual catch limits for red grouper for the commercial and recreational fisheries.

Commercial Landings

Figure 2 shows the commercial landings of red grouper from the Gulf of Mexico Region. Since 2011, the Gulf States supplied 98.3 % of the entire red grouper domestic landings averaging 5.8 million pounds and valued at $17.7 million annually. Florida West Coast is the largest producing state in the Gulf of Mexico, supplying 98.3% of all domestically-caught red grouper and almost all of the landings in the Gulf of Mexico region.

Red-Grouper-Annual-Landings-GOM
Figure 2. Annual commercial landings of red grouper in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Fish Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

In 2016, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of red grouper reached 5.3 million pounds. This fish species was caught year-round with most of the landings occurring during the fall-spring months (Figure 3).

Red-Grouper-Monthly-Landings-GOM
Figure 3. Monthly distribution of commercial landings of red grouper in the Gulf of Mexico Region in 2016. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

There are more than 100 fishing businesses, seafood processing plants, seafood and fish markets, and seafood restaurants registered in MarketMaker nationwide which harvest, process, sell, and serve grouper in the United States.

Click this LINK to view the search results online. Relevance, distance and alphabetically can be used to sort the online database of fishing businesses. You can also limit online searches by state, county, city or number of miles from a specified location, and type of business.

Economic Contributions of Commercial Fishing Industry

The economic contribution an industry makes locally, region-wide, nation-wide, or globally is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the fishing industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The IMPLAN economic model estimates of the economic contributions regarding output or sales, employment or jobs, labor income, value added and tax revenues. The income, value-added, and output contributions are expressed in dollars for the year specified by the user. Output or sales are the gross sales by businesses within the economic region affected by an activity. Labor income includes personal income including wages and salaries and proprietors’ income or income from self-employment. Employment contributions are expressed in terms of a mix of both full-time and part-time jobs. Value-added is the contribution made to the value of seafood products at each stage of harvesting, processing, and distribution.

The total economic contribution is the sum of direct, indirect and induced effects. The direct effects express the economic impacts in the sector in which the expenditure was initially made. Indirect effects result from changes in the economic activity of other industrial sectors which supply goods or services to the commercial fishing industry. Induced effects are the product of personal consumption expenditures by industry employees.

The annual commercial dockside values of red grouper in the Gulf of Mexico Region in 2016 reached $17.8 million, which was 0.9% more than the average annual dockside values since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial red grouper fishing in 2016 amounted to $34 million (Figure 4). The red grouper commercial fishing created 473 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $12.2 million in the Gulf regional economy.

Red-Grouper-Gulf-economic-contribution
Figure 4. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2016 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set to 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

The red grouper commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. About $2.1 million was estimated to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were expected to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to $1.0 million as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

For more information, go to Posadas, B.C. and A.E. Jefferson. Commercial Red Grouper Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 7, May 29, 2018. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Economic contributions of commercial yellowtail snapper fishing

Yellowtail-Snapper2
Figure 1. Yellowtail snapper (Ocyurus chrysurus, Bloch, 1791). The photo was taken by Amanda E. Jefferson.

Commercial Landings

The long-term annual commercial yellowtail snapper landings in the Gulf of Mexico states are shown below. Since 2011, the Florida West Coast supplied 94.5% of the whole yellowtail snapper domestic landings averaging 2.0 million pounds and valued at $5.9 million annually. The Eastern Atlantic states provided the rest of the total domestic landings. Dockside prices of yellowtail snapper averaged about $3.00 per pound during the past six years.

Yellowtail-Snapper-Annual-Landings-GOM

Figure 2. Annual commercial yellowtail snapper landings in the Gulf of Mexico states. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: July 5, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

Economic Contributions

The economic contribution commercial yellowtail snapper fishing makes locally, region-wide, or nation-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of yellowtail snapper in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $6.9 million, which was 22.7% more than the average yearly dockside values in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial Yellowtail snapper fishing in 2016 amounted to $13.2 million. The yellowtail snapper commercial fishing sustained 183 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $4.7 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The yellowtail snapper commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. More than $800,000 was projected to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to almost $400,000 as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Monthly Gulf of Mexico States Shrimp Landings from June 1995 to June 2018

ShrimpLandingsMSJune

A total of 879,000 pounds (headless) of all shrimp species were landed in Mississippi in June 2018, which was 59 percent of the seven-year average landings since after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The annual shrimp landings in Mississippi since 2011 averaged 1.479 million pounds.

ShrimpLandingsALJune
About 1.578 million pounds (headless) of all shrimp species were landed in Alabama in June 2018, which was 15 percent more than the seven-year average landings since after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The annual shrimp landings in Alabama since 2011 averaged 1.376 million pounds.

ShrimpLandingsGulfJune

Around 10.428 million pounds (headless) of all shrimp species were landed in all five Gulf of Mexico states in June 2018, which was 28 percent less than the seven-year average landings since after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The annual shrimp landings in the entire Gulf region since 2011 averaged 14.386 million pounds.

Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting.

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html.

Tomato growers in Mississippi

Number of tomato farms 

The 2012 Census of Agriculture enumerated 647 farms in Mississippi which harvested tomatoes for sale.  About 213 farms or 34 percent were located in the coastal region.

2012-MS-Tomato-Farms
2012-MS-Tomato-Farms-Percent
Figure 1. Distribution of tomato farms in Mississippi by region. Source of raw data: 2012 Census of Agriculture. USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Office.

 

Distribution of tomato farms by farm size 

The average size of tomato farms in Mississippi was 0.57 acres. Almost half of all the farms surveyed had acreage below 0.5 acres.

2012-MS-Tomato-Farms-By-Sizes2012-MS-Tomato-Farm-Sizes
Figure 2. Distribution of tomato farms in Mississippi by farm size and region. Source of raw data: 2012 Census of Agriculture. USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Office.

 

Distribution of tomato farms by acreage 

The 2012 Census of Agriculture reported that the tomato farms in Mississippi harvested a total of 444 acres.  The charts below show the actual distribution of those farms which reported acreage.

2012-MS-Tomato-Acres2012-MS-Tomato-Acres-Percent
Figure 3. Distribution of tomato farms in Mississippi by acreage and region. Source of raw data: 2012 Census of Agriculture. USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Office.

There are more than 100 tomato farms which are registered in the Mississippi MarketMaker.  To view the directory online, go to https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/ and then type tomatoes in the Search Box.

 

 

Monthly Gulf of Mexico States Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices from Jan 2013 to June 2018

The prices shown below are official data from NOAA Fisheries. The charts show the dockside prices of various Penaeid shrimp products landed in the five Gulf of Mexico states from Jan. 2013 to June 2018.

The vertical or Y-axis shows the ex-vessel prices expressed in dollars per pound of headless shrimp. The ex-vessel prices of shrimp products in heads on forms are much lower than those reported prices. You need the yield ratio from heads on to headless forms in order to convert those prices.

The horizontal or X-axis shows the month and year the shrimp products were landed.

All prices are in dollars per pound. Penaeid species only, headless. The source of raw data is the NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. The following legends are used: Eastern – Florida West Coast, Northern – Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and Western – Texas, and Count – the number of shrimps per pound.

shrimp-evp-Northernshrimp-evp-Westernshrimp-evp-Eastern

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-prices.html.

Mangos in Mississippi — Mississippi Fruit and Nut Blog

Sorry if I got your hopes up but there are no mango trees grown outdoors in Mississippi. Why? Our climate is certainly hot enough in the summer, but summer is not the problem. Even though our winters are what I would call “mild”, they are not mild enough. But before I explain why, let’s […]

via Mangos in Mississippi — Mississippi Fruit and Nut Blog

Economic Contribution of Commercial Black Drum Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

Black-drum-Joe-Jewell-small
Figure 1. Black drum (Pogonias cromis). Illustration by Joe Jewell. Mississippi Saltwater Fish. Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, Biloxi, MS.

Commercial Landings

The long-term annual commercial black drum (Fig. 1) landings in the Gulf of Mexico states are shown in Fig. 2. Since 2011, the Gulf supplied 96% of the total black drum domestic landings averaging 5.8 million pounds and valued at $5.3 million annually. Louisiana and Texas were the most significant suppliers averaging 64% and 30% of the total domestic landings, respectively. Dockside prices of black drum averaged about $0.91 per pound during the past six years (Fig. 3).

Drum-Black-Annual-Landings-GOM
Figure 2. The primary vertical axis shows the yearly commercial landings in pounds while the secondary vertical axis indicates the annual commercial dockside values in dollars. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: August 7, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

Drum-Black-Dockside-Prices-GOM
Figure 3. The vertical axis shows the average yearly dockside prices in dollars per pound. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: August 7, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

Economic Contributions

The economic contribution commercial black drum fishing makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of black drum in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $6.1 million, which was 19.4% more than the average yearly dockside values in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial Black drum fishing in 2016 amounted to $11.6 million (Fig. 4). This output of goods and service created by the black drum commercial fishing and related industries sustained 161 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $4.2 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The black drum commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. More than $711,000 was projected to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to almost $348,000 as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Black-drum-Gulf-economic-contribution
Figure 4. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2016 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set at 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Attend Online: Understanding USDA Farm Service Agency Programs for Shellfish Growers — Sea Grant in the Gulf of Mexico

Shellfish growers who want to learn more about USDA Farm Service Agency programs that provide support and disaster relief may want to tune in to a free broadcast of a seminar on Friday, Aug. 24 , from 2-4 pm organized by the University of Florida IFAS Extension service. Heather Boyd, agricultural program specialist at Florida’s……

via Attend Online: Understanding USDA Farm Service Agency Programs for Shellfish Growers — Sea Grant in the Gulf of Mexico

Vegetable Growers in Mississippi

2012-MS-Vegetable-Acres-Without-Potatoes-%
Figure 1. Percent distribution of vegetable acres excluding potatoes harvested for sale in Mississippi. Source of raw data: 2012 Census of Agriculture. USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Office.

The 2012 Census of Agriculture enumerated 1,210 farms in Mississippi which harvested vegetables for sale.  These vegetable farms harvested a total of 29,914 acres.  About 175 farms covering 6,714 acres harvested vegetables for processing. Around 1,146 farms harvested 23,200 acres for the fresh market.

In 2012, Mississippi vegetable farms which grew potatoes numbered 305. The total acreage devoted to potato production was limited at 229 acres.

Sweet potatoes were extensively grown by 89 vegetable farms in Mississippi.  A total of 22,172 acres were devoted to sweet potato production, mostly in the northern counties.

2012-MS-Vegetable-Acres-With-Potatoes-%
Figure 2. Percent distribution of vegetable acres including potatoes harvested for sale in Mississippi. Source of raw data: 2012 Census of Agriculture. USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Office.

 

 

 

Gulf Sea Grant regional meeting November 14-16 in Alabama — Sea Grant in the Gulf of Mexico

The four Sea Grant programs in the Gulf of Mexico–Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi-Alabama, and Florida–will assemble this November in Dauphin Island, Alabama, to discuss issues of shared interest across the region. The event will provide networking opportunities, facilitate the comparison of strategies and best practices around the Gulf, and serve as a platform for finding solutions……

via Gulf Sea Grant regional meeting November 14-16 in Alabama — Sea Grant in the Gulf of Mexico