Value Added Producer Grants

The VAPG program helps agricultural producers enter into value-added activities related to the processing and/or marketing of bio-based, value-added products. Generating new products, creating and expanding marketing opportunities, and increasing producer income are the goals of this program. You may receive priority if you are a beginning farmer or rancher, a socially-disadvantaged farmer or rancher, a small or medium-sized farm or ranch structured as a family farm, a farmer or rancher cooperative, or are proposing a mid-tier value chain. Grants are awarded through a national competition.

Application Deadline:
Paper ApplicationJuly 1, 2016
Electronic Application:  June 24, 2016

For more details about the VAP grants, go to: http://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/value-added-producer-grants.

Diesel fuel prices influence fishermen’s decision to go or not to go fishing

monthly-Gulf-diesel-fuel-prices

The chart above shows the long-term trends in the retail prices of diesel fuel in the Gulf of Mexico region. How did this trends impacted commercial fishing in the state and beyond?  This is the subject of graphic and econometric modeling efforts I am currently undertaking in determining the economic recovery paths of the state marine fisheries industries as a result of the recent natural and technological disasters.

ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI MARINE FINFISH INDUSTRY

Economic Sectors

  1. Commercial harvesting corresponds to economic sectors 114111 or “finfish fishing” and 114112 or “shellfish fishing” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  2. Seafood processing primarily corresponds to code 311711 or “seafood canning” and code 311712 or “fresh and frozen seafood processing” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  3. Seafood wholesaling corresponds to NAICS codes 424460 or “fish and seafood merchant wholesalers” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  4. Fish and seafood markets correspond to NAICS code 445220 or “fish and seafood markets” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  5. Eating and drinking places include “full-service restaurants” andlimited-service restaurants”in the North American Industrial Classification System.

Economic Impacts

The NOAA Fisheries Economic Model generates estimates for four types of impacts – employment, income, total value added, and output. The income, total value added, and output impacts are expressed in dollars for the year specified by the user. Employment impacts are expressed in terms of a mix of both full-time and part-time jobs.

The total economic impact is the sum of direct, indirect and induced impacts. Indirect impacts result from changes in economic activity of other industrial sectors which supply goods or services to the sector being evaluated. Induced impacts are the result of personal consumption expenditures by industry employees.

Using secondary data on Mississippi marine finfish commercial landings and seafood processing and survey data on seafood wholesaling and retailing, the total economic impacts of the entire seafood industry made by NOAA Fisheries in 2011 were broken down by major species. The economic impacts of the Mississippi marine finfish industry are shown in the table below:

finfish2011

ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI CRAB INDUSTRY

Economic Sectors

  1. Commercial harvesting corresponds to economic sectors 114111 or “finfish fishing” and 114112 or “shellfish fishing” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  2. Seafood processing primarily corresponds to code 311711 or “seafood canning” and code 311712 or “fresh and frozen seafood processing” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  3. Seafood wholesaling corresponds to NAICS codes 424460 or “fish and seafood merchant wholesalers” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  4. Fish and seafood markets correspond to NAICS code 445220 or “fish and seafood markets” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  5. Eating and drinking places include “full-service restaurants” andlimited-service restaurants”in the North American Industrial Classification System.

Economic Impacts

The NOAA Fisheries Economic Model generates estimates for four types of impacts – employment, income, total value added, and output. The income, total value added, and output impacts are expressed in dollars for the year specified by the user. Employment impacts are expressed in terms of a mix of both full-time and part-time jobs.

The total economic impact is the sum of direct, indirect and induced impacts. Indirect impacts result from changes in economic activity of other industrial sectors which supply goods or services to the sector being evaluated. Induced impacts are the result of personal consumption expenditures by industry employees.

Using secondary data on Mississippi crab commercial landings and seafood processing and survey data on seafood wholesaling and retailing, the total economic impacts of the entire seafood industry made by NOAA Fisheries in 2011 were broken down by major species. The economic impacts of the Mississippi crab industry are shown in the table below:

crab2011

Economic Impacts of the Mississippi Oyster Industry

Economic Sectors

  1. Commercial harvesting corresponds to economic sectors 114111 or “finfish fishing” and 114112 or “shellfish fishing” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  2. Seafood processing primarily corresponds to code 311711 or “seafood canning” and code 311712 or “fresh and frozen seafood processing” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  3. Seafood wholesaling corresponds to NAICS codes 424460 or “fish and seafood merchant wholesalers” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  4. Fish and seafood markets correspond to NAICS code 445220 or “fish and seafood markets” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  5. Eating and drinking places include “full-service restaurants” andlimited-service restaurants”in the North American Industrial Classification System.

Economic Impacts

The NOAA Fisheries Economic Model generates estimates for four types of impacts – employment, income, total value added, and output. The income, total value added, and output impacts are expressed in dollars for the year specified by the user. Employment impacts are expressed in terms of a mix of both full-time and part-time jobs.

The total economic impact is the sum of direct, indirect and induced impacts. Indirect impacts result from changes in economic activity of other industrial sectors which supply goods or services to the sector being evaluated. Induced impacts are the result of personal consumption expenditures by industry employees.

Using secondary data on Mississippi oyster commercial landings and seafood processing and survey data on seafood wholesaling and retailing, the total economic impacts of the entire seafood industry made by NOAA Fisheries in 2011 were broken down by major species. The economic impacts of the Mississippi oyster industry are shown in the table below:

SalesImpactsOysterMS2011

Economic Impacts of the Mississippi Shrimp Industry

Economic Sectors

  1. Commercial harvesting corresponds to economic sectors 114111 or “finfish fishing” and 114112 or “shellfish fishing” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  2. Seafood processing primarily corresponds to code 311711 or “seafood canning” and code 311712 or “fresh and frozen seafood processing” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  3. Seafood wholesaling corresponds to NAICS codes 424460 or “fish and seafood merchant wholesalers” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  4. Fish and seafood markets correspond to NAICS code 445220 or “fish and seafood markets” in the North American Industrial Classification System.
  5. Eating and drinking places include “full-service restaurants” andlimited-service restaurants”in the North American Industrial Classification System.

Economic Impacts

The NOAA Fisheries Economic Model generates estimates for four types of impacts – employment, income, total value added, and output. The income, total value added, and output impacts are expressed in dollars for the year specified by the user. Employment impacts are expressed in terms of a mix of both full-time and part-time jobs.

The total economic impact is the sum of direct, indirect and induced impacts. Indirect impacts result from changes in economic activity of other industrial sectors which supply goods or services to the sector being evaluated. Induced impacts are the result of personal consumption expenditures by industry employees.

Using secondary data on Mississippi shrimp commercial landings and seafood processing and survey data on seafood wholesaling and retailing, the total economic impacts of the entire seafood industry made by NOAA Fisheries in 2011 were broken down by major species. The economic impacts of the Mississippi shrimp industry are shown in the tables below:

shrimp-impacts- 2011

Disaster Preparedness & Recovery Information

In cooperation with the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, Mississippi Department of Homeland Security, and Federal Emergency Management Agency through USDA, the Mississippi State University Extension Service is providing relevant, research-based, information on this page that deals with various disaster preparedness and recovery issues.

Online publications are available for viewing or download at http://msucares.com/disaster/#flooding.

2016 General Pest Management Workshop – Wednesday, March 23, 2016

The 2016 General Pest Management Workshop will be held on Wednesday, March 23, 2016, at the Central Mississippi Research and Extension Center in Raymond, MS. The workshop will consist of a morning and afternoon session and lunch will be provided.

This workshop has been approved by the Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce Bureau of Plant Industry for consultant recertification for entomology, plant pathology, and weed control. Recertification will only be issued for certificates expiring within 12 months. The workshop has also been listed as an in-service training (ANR 148) for MSU Extension agents.

Agents planning to attend need to sign up for in-service training and register for the workshop.

 

Mississippi green industry contributed over $1.6 billion to state economy

Economic-Impacts-2013-Mississippi

What is the the Green Industry?

The environmental horticulture industry, or green industry, is comprised of wholesale nursery, greenhouse, and turfgrass sod producers, landscape design, construction and maintenance firms, and wholesale and retail distribution firms such as garden centers, home stores, mass merchandisers with lawn/garden departments, brokers and re-wholesale distribution centers, and allied trades suppliers of inputs to the industry.

Components of Green Industry

The green industry production and manufacturing industry group includes (1) greenhouse, nursery, and floriculture production, and (2) lawn and garden tractor and home lawn and garden equipment manufacturing. The horticultural services industry group includes (1) landscaping services, and (2) landscape architectural services. The wholesale and retail trade industry group includes (1) farm and garden equipment merchant wholesalers  (2) nursery and florist merchant wholesalers, (3) lawn and garden equipment and supplies stores, (4) florists, and (5) food and beverage stores, lawn and garden sales, (6) gasoline stores, lawn and garden sales, (7) general merchandise stores, lawn and garden sales, and (8) non-store retailers, lawn and garden sales.

Economic Impacts of the Green Industry 

Results of the study conducted by the Green Industry Research Consortium showed that in 2013 the entire green industry contributed $1.625 billion to the economy of the state of Mississippi. The total employment impacts of the entire green industry complex totaled 15,821 jobs.

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices: Under 15

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices
Eastern, Northern and Western Gulf
Count Under 15 Per Pound

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless.
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;
Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
Western – Texas;
Count – number of shrimp per pound.

shrimpevpGullfUnder15

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices: 15-20

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices
Eastern, Northern and Western Gulf
Count 15-20 Per Pound

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless.
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;
Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
Western – Texas;
Count – number of shrimp per pound.

shrimpevpGullf1520

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices: 21-25

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices
Eastern, Northern and Western Gulf
Count 21-25 Per Pound

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless.
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;
Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
Western – Texas;
Count – number of shrimp per pound.

shrimpevpGullf2125

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices: 26-30

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices
Eastern, Northern and Western Gulf
Count 26-30 Per Pound

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless.
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;
Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
Western – Texas;
Count – number of shrimp per pound.

shrimpevpGullf2630

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices: 31-35

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices
Eastern, Northern and Western Gulf
Count 31-35 Per Pound

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless.
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;
Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
Western – Texas;
Count – number of shrimp per pound.

shrimpevpGullf3135

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices: 36-40

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices
Eastern, Northern and Western Gulf
Count 36-40 Per Pound

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless.
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;
Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
Western – Texas;
Count – number of shrimp per pound.

shrimpevpGullf3640

Horticulture and Marine Economics Program Online Valuation Survey

The Coastal Research and Extension Center is Mississippi State University’s “southern exposure,” linking residents of the coastal region to the university. The center’s mission is to conduct research and education programs aimed at developing a better understanding and use of renewable and nonrenewable resources in south Mississippi. Its applied research and educational programs with biological, physical and social systems focus on enhancing the quality of life of residents of Mississippi and other Gulf states. Our priorities address the specific needs of diverse communities including the health and wellbeing of the people and responsible stewardship of unique natural resources.

This 6-point online valuation survey is limited to the assessment of economic benefits to households, industry and government institutions resulting from research, education and extension efforts of the Horticulture and Marine Economics (HME) program. The survey is a critical first step in conducting a future systematic assessment of the economic benefits resulting from this program. This online valuation survey will compile the following economic benefits received by households, private businesses, government offices and non-profit organizations resulting from the following research and extension efforts:

  1. Socio-economic impacts of nursery/greenhouse automation/mechanization
  2. Community economic and disaster preparedness
  3. Economic recovery from natural and technological disasters
  4. Saltwater fishing preferences of Mississippi lifetime sportsmen
  5. Direct marketing of food, seafood and outdoor tourism
  6. Economic impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill
  7. Economic impacts of natural disasters on marine industries
  8. Economic impact analysis of programs and regulations
  9. Other horticulture, marine and coastal economic issues

Please answer all six questions at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/hortmarine.

I truly appreciate your participation in this online valuation survey of my research and extension program.

Best regards,

Ben Posadas, Ph.D.
Associate Extension Research Professor of Economics
Mississippi State University
Email: ben.posadas@msstate.edu

Current Mechanization Practices Among Greenhouse and Mixed Nursery/Greenhouse Operations in Selected Southern States

cropped-benpatfarwestshow.jpgFrom 2003 through 2009, the socioeconomic survey of nursery automation was conducted in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. We surveyed 215 growers, and 127 were used for the purpose of this study (75 mixed operations and 53 greenhouse-only operations). All participating growers were asked a series of questions to determine the types of automation or mechanization employed in the performance of 10 major greenhouse tasks: media preparation, container filling, cutting and seed collection, cutting and seed preparation, sticking cuttings and planting seed, environmental control, harvesting and grading production, fertilizer application, pesticide application, and irrigation application and management.

Coker, Randal Y., Benedict C. Posadas, Scott A. Langlois, Patricia R. Knight, and Christine H. Coker. 2015. Current Mechanization Systems among Greenhouses and Mixed Operations. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Bulletin 1208. Mississippi State, Mississippi.  http://msucares.com/pubs/bulletins/b1208.pdf