Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices: Under 15

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices
Eastern, Northern and Western Gulf
Count Under 15 Per Pound

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless.
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;
Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
Western – Texas;
Count – number of shrimp per pound.

shrimpevpGullfUnder15

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices: 15-20

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices
Eastern, Northern and Western Gulf
Count 15-20 Per Pound

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless.
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;
Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
Western – Texas;
Count – number of shrimp per pound.

shrimpevpGullf1520

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices: 21-25

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices
Eastern, Northern and Western Gulf
Count 21-25 Per Pound

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless.
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;
Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
Western – Texas;
Count – number of shrimp per pound.

shrimpevpGullf2125

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices: 26-30

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices
Eastern, Northern and Western Gulf
Count 26-30 Per Pound

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless.
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;
Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
Western – Texas;
Count – number of shrimp per pound.

shrimpevpGullf2630

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices: 31-35

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices
Eastern, Northern and Western Gulf
Count 31-35 Per Pound

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless.
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;
Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
Western – Texas;
Count – number of shrimp per pound.

shrimpevpGullf3135

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices: 36-40

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices
Eastern, Northern and Western Gulf
Count 36-40 Per Pound

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless.
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast;
Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
Western – Texas;
Count – number of shrimp per pound.

shrimpevpGullf3640

Horticulture and Marine Economics Program Online Valuation Survey

The Coastal Research and Extension Center is Mississippi State University’s “southern exposure,” linking residents of the coastal region to the university. The center’s mission is to conduct research and education programs aimed at developing a better understanding and use of renewable and nonrenewable resources in south Mississippi. Its applied research and educational programs with biological, physical and social systems focus on enhancing the quality of life of residents of Mississippi and other Gulf states. Our priorities address the specific needs of diverse communities including the health and wellbeing of the people and responsible stewardship of unique natural resources.

This 6-point online valuation survey is limited to the assessment of economic benefits to households, industry and government institutions resulting from research, education and extension efforts of the Horticulture and Marine Economics (HME) program. The survey is a critical first step in conducting a future systematic assessment of the economic benefits resulting from this program. This online valuation survey will compile the following economic benefits received by households, private businesses, government offices and non-profit organizations resulting from the following research and extension efforts:

  1. Socio-economic impacts of nursery/greenhouse automation/mechanization
  2. Community economic and disaster preparedness
  3. Economic recovery from natural and technological disasters
  4. Saltwater fishing preferences of Mississippi lifetime sportsmen
  5. Direct marketing of food, seafood and outdoor tourism
  6. Economic impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill
  7. Economic impacts of natural disasters on marine industries
  8. Economic impact analysis of programs and regulations
  9. Other horticulture, marine and coastal economic issues

Please answer all six questions at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/hortmarine.

I truly appreciate your participation in this online valuation survey of my research and extension program.

Best regards,

Ben Posadas, Ph.D.
Associate Extension Research Professor of Economics
Mississippi State University
Email: ben.posadas@msstate.edu

Monthly Gulf of Mexico and Mississippi Shrimp Landings, Oct 2008 to Oct 2015

Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting.

ShrimpLandingsGulfOctober.jpgShrimpLandingsMSOctober.jpg

Monthly Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices Count 41-50

Prices are in dollars per pound. Penaied species only, headless. Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: Eastern – Florida West Coast; Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana; Western – Texas; Count – number of shrimp per pound.

gulfevp

 

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Annual blueberry education workshop in Hattiesburg, MS

BlueberryWorkshop2016_Page_1.jpg

Current Mechanization Practices Among Greenhouse and Mixed Nursery/Greenhouse Operations in Selected Southern States

cropped-benpatfarwestshow.jpgFrom 2003 through 2009, the socioeconomic survey of nursery automation was conducted in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. We surveyed 215 growers, and 127 were used for the purpose of this study (75 mixed operations and 53 greenhouse-only operations). All participating growers were asked a series of questions to determine the types of automation or mechanization employed in the performance of 10 major greenhouse tasks: media preparation, container filling, cutting and seed collection, cutting and seed preparation, sticking cuttings and planting seed, environmental control, harvesting and grading production, fertilizer application, pesticide application, and irrigation application and management.

Coker, Randal Y., Benedict C. Posadas, Scott A. Langlois, Patricia R. Knight, and Christine H. Coker. 2015. Current Mechanization Systems among Greenhouses and Mixed Operations. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Bulletin 1208. Mississippi State, Mississippi.  http://msucares.com/pubs/bulletins/b1208.pdf

Economic Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Mississippi Seafood and Commercial and Saltwater Recreational Fishing Sectors in 2010

oil_rig_offshore_waters

Posadas, Benedict C. 2015. Economic Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill to Mississippi Seafood, and Commercial and Recreational Fishing Sectors. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Bulletin 1218, Mississippi State, Mississippi.

This bulletin presents the results of an economic survey of the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on business operations of Mississippi seafood and commercial and saltwater recreational fishing establishments in 2010. These primary data establish the cause-and-effect relationships between the associated economic impacts in affected economic sectors and the oil spill incident. The 331 Mississippi businesses that participated in the survey accounted for 25–65% of the total annual gross sales or employment in sectors included. The oil-spill-related closures of state and federal waters resulted in the shutdown of business operations of participating establishments, on average, for about 4.21 months. In 2010, the direct economic impacts of the oil spill resulted in a decline of almost one-half of the annual total sales and one-third of the total employment as compared with 2009.

Available for download at http://msucares.com/pubs/bulletins/b1218.pdf.

ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY FROM NATURAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL DISASTERS

GOM_CountiesIn order to understand the magnitude of the economic impacts of the natural and technological disasters during the past decade to the commercial fishing industry, multi-year baseline economic information about the industry in all the five Gulf of Mexico states are currently being compiled from various secondary sources. Commercial Fishing corresponds to economic sectors 114111 (Finfish Fishing) and 114112 (Shellfish Fishing) in the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS).

  1. Finfish Fishing comprises establishments primarily engaged in the commercial catching or taking of finfish (e.g., bluefish, salmon, trout, tuna) from their natural habitat.
  2. Shellfish Fishing comprises establishments primarily engaged in the commercial catching or taking of shellfish (e.g., clams, crabs, lobsters, mussels, oysters, sea urchins, shrimp) from their natural habitat.

Click the following LINKS to view the recovery path of the Commercial Fishing industry in all five Gulf States:

  1. Alabama  
  2. Florida West Coast 
  3. Louisiana 
  4. Mississippi 
  5. Texas 
  6. Gulf 

Click the following LINKS to view the recovery path of the Commercial Fishing industry by major species:

  1. Shrimp 
  2. Oysters 
  3. Blue crab 
  4. Menhaden 
  5. Foodfish 

NEW MAFES BULLETIN ON MISSISSIPPI LIFETIME SPORTSMEN

lifetimesportsmenbylicensetype&licenseyear

As of September 1, 2010, there were 14,706 Mississippi lifetime sportsman licensed by the Mississippi Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Parks. Most of the lifetime sportsmen reside in Mississippi and surrounding states of Louisiana, Tennessee, Alabama and Texas. There were 11,700 lifetime sportsmen residing in Mississippi or 79.6% of the total number of licenses sold from 1989 to 2011. The counties of Rankin, Hinds and Madison have the most lifetime sportsmen in the state of Mississippi.

Source: Posadas, Benedict C. and Amanda K. Seymour. 2014.   Socioeconomic Characteristics of Mississippi Lifetime Sportsmen. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Bulletin 1211, Mississippi State, Mississippi.

Download the entire MAFES Bulletin from http://msucares.com/pubs/bulletins/b1211.pdf 

Suggested Approach in Estimating the Economic Impacts of Research, Education And Outreach Projects

This publication demonstrates how standard economic impact analysis can be used to estimate the marginal economic impacts of Sea Grant projects in Mississippi and Alabama. The sales and jobs multipliers of various economic sectors were computed using economic impact analysis data and software. Two levels of marginal economic impacts of Sea Grant projects were estimated in 2012 for selected projects. The initial marginal economic impacts estimation template consisted of a scenario where Sea Grant projects received $70,000 in federal funding for 2012. Initial marginal economic impacts refer to the creation of additional economic output, jobs, and incomes arising from expenditures on goods and services needed to successfully complete each project. The final marginal economic impacts template consisted of various scenarios where annual gross sales or annual labor income was increased by $1 million in 2012 due to new technology developed by Sea Grant projects. Final marginal economic impacts consist of the creation of new output, more jobs, and additional income associated with the adoption of the results of Sea Grant projects by producers and households. Specific examples from Sea Grant activities were used in estimating the two levels of economic impacts.

Source: Posadas, Benedict C. 2015. Suggested Approach in Estimating the Economic Impacts of Research, Education And Outreach ProjectsMississippi State University Extension Service publication 2883 and Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant publication MASGC-14-035. Mississippi State, Mississippi.

LONG-TERM MISSISSIPPI OYSTER LANDINGS

The chart below shows the commercial landings of oysters in the state of Mississippi since 1880. Data from 1880 to 1949 were compiled from various statistical publications published by NOAA Fisheries. Data from 1950 to the present were compiled from the NOAA website.

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The market share of Mississippi oysters to total domestic landings in the U.S. was very erratic, reaching as high as 6.3 percent in 1964.

MSOysterMarketShare

The imputed ex-vessel prices of Mississippi oysters relative to the average ex-vessel prices of all oysters harvested from the U.S. are shown in the chart below. Except in three years in the late 1980s, Mississippi oysters were landed at prices lower than the average for all oyster producing states in the U.S.

MSOystersRelativeEVP

ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI OYSTER INDUSTRY IN THE YEAR 2011

The economic impacts of the Mississippi oyster industry are shown in the tables below. The entire Mississippi oyster industry generated total economic impacts amounting to $13.47 million. The industry created total employment impacts equivalent to 354 jobs.

SalesImpactsOysterMS2011.

USDA-ERS Webinar on Local Food Systems: What do we know about national trends?

Join Economist Sarah Low on Thursday, January 29, 2015 at 11:30 a.m. EST. Sarah will overview ERS’s forthcoming report, to be released on January 29th at 10 a.m., on local food systems, “Trends in U.S. Local and Regional Food Systems: Report to Congress.” She will present the latest estimates on sales and farm participation in local food systems. She will also provide the first analyses comparing prices between direct-to-consumer outlets and conventional grocery outlets and local food farm growth and survival between 2007 and 2012.  The webinar will include results from the USDA Farm to School census and the 2012 Census of Agriculture as well as an overview of the literature on consumer willingness to pay, environmental impacts, and policy related to local foods systems at the Federal, state, and local/regional levels.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/food-markets-prices/local-foods.aspx

Coastal Research & Extension Center Commodity Advisory Council

February 24, 2015

Coastal Research and Extension Center
1815 Popps Ferry Road, Biloxi, MS 39532

9:00 am – 3:00 pm

Please RSVP by February 17, 2015
Via email: LesterM@ext.msstate.edu or
phone: 228-546-1004

Individuals are invited to this Advisory Council are as representatives of specific commodities and are asked by Mississippi State University to evaluate and provide future direction for research and educational programs for their commodity. Your input is extremely valuable to us in setting priorities for the coming year.

Please see the attached Flyer for more details.

pac2015

Economic Sectors Targeted By Sea Grant Research, Education, and Outreach Programs

Benedict Posadas1
1Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center
benp@ext.msstate.edu

Benedict Posadas is an Associate Extension/Research Professor of Economics at the Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center and Marine Economist at the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Extension Program

Sea Grant, an organization with a history of working closely with water-dependent industries, has documented many examples where research, education, and outreach (REO) programs have increased private-sector economic activity, including the creation or expansion of businesses and jobs. Yet, there has not been a systematic survey in the Gulf region to assess the full scope of these impacts. This preliminary study provides general information about the benefits the region’s industries have gained from REO efforts sponsored by the Gulf of Mexico Sea Grant Programs. The study is a critical first step in conducting a future systematic assessment of the economic benefits resulting from these programs.

The Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium (MASGC) has four focus areas: (1) Environmental Literacy and Workforce Development, (2) Healthy Coastal Ecosystems, (3) Resilient Communities and Economies, and (4) Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture. The North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) was used to identify the U.S. industries targeted by MASGC-REO efforts during the past decade.

Under “sustainable fisheries and aquaculture,” the following industries were listed: (1) commercial fishing, (2) seafood processing, (3) seafood wholesaling, (4) seafood retailing, (5) marine aquaculture, and (6) live-bait dealers.

The “healthy coastal ecosystems” focus area includes (1) research and development in biotechnology; (2) research and development in the physical, engineering, and life sciences; and (3) research and development in the social sciences and humanities.

Under “resilient communities and economies,” these industries were identified: (1) working waterfronts, (2) commercial marinas, (3) charter boats for hire, (4) saltwater recreational fishing, (5) wildlife watching, (6) coastal restoration, and (6) ship building and repair.

Under the focus area “environmental literacy and workforce development,” five industries were identified: (1) other justice, public order, and safety activities; (2) administration of air and water resource and solid waste management programs; (3) administration of general economic programs; (4) regulation of agricultural marketing and commodities; and (5) household sector.

The long-term data on the economic contributions of the targeted industries to the regional economy of each of the five Gulf States were compiled from various secondary sources. The time-series economic indicators consist of the annual sales and employment impacts of each sector served by Sea Grant projects. In some cases, only the direct employment impacts were available for compilation. When assessing the initial economic impacts on the U.S. industry or economic sectors by Sea Grant projects, these time-series economic indicators set the upper limits to the annual impacts that these projects can generate.

There is a pressing need to adequately measure the significant contributions of Sea Grant projects to targeted U.S. industries or economic sectors. Principal investigators and project managers should consider developing robust theoretical frameworks and primary survey procedures when designing and evaluating the long-term economic impacts and economic benefits associated with each proposed project. These performance measures can be evaluated by project staff and/or outside evaluators.