Vegetable Growers in Mississippi

2012-MS-Vegetable-Acres-Without-Potatoes-%
Figure 1. Percent distribution of vegetable acres excluding potatoes harvested for sale in Mississippi. Source of raw data: 2012 Census of Agriculture. USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Office.

The 2012 Census of Agriculture enumerated 1,210 farms in Mississippi which harvested vegetables for sale.  These vegetable farms harvested a total of 29,914 acres.  About 175 farms covering 6,714 acres harvested vegetables for processing. Around 1,146 farms harvested 23,200 acres for the fresh market.

In 2012, Mississippi vegetable farms which grew potatoes numbered 305. The total acreage devoted to potato production was limited at 229 acres.

Sweet potatoes were extensively grown by 89 vegetable farms in Mississippi.  A total of 22,172 acres were devoted to sweet potato production, mostly in the northern counties.

2012-MS-Vegetable-Acres-With-Potatoes-%
Figure 2. Percent distribution of vegetable acres including potatoes harvested for sale in Mississippi. Source of raw data: 2012 Census of Agriculture. USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Office.

 

 

 

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Gulf Sea Grant regional meeting November 14-16 in Alabama — Sea Grant in the Gulf of Mexico

The four Sea Grant programs in the Gulf of Mexico–Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi-Alabama, and Florida–will assemble this November in Dauphin Island, Alabama, to discuss issues of shared interest across the region. The event will provide networking opportunities, facilitate the comparison of strategies and best practices around the Gulf, and serve as a platform for finding solutions……

via Gulf Sea Grant regional meeting November 14-16 in Alabama — Sea Grant in the Gulf of Mexico

Bays and Bayous Symposium committee releases call for abstracts, sessions — Sea Grant in the Gulf of Mexico

The 2018 Alabama-Mississippi Bays and Bayous Symposium Program Committee has released a call for abstracts and sessions for the Nov. 28-29 event in Mobile, Alabama. Scientists, resource managers, elected officials or agency representatives, community action group members, industry representatives and others are invited to highlight their research findings and environmental efforts through oral presentations, individually……

via Bays and Bayous Symposium committee releases call for abstracts, sessions — Sea Grant in the Gulf of Mexico

Economic Contributions of Commercial Spiny Lobster Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

Commercial Landings

The long-term annual commercial spiny lobster landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region are shown in Figure 1. Since 2011, the Gulf States supplied 97% of the entire spiny lobster domestic landings averaging 4.9 million pounds and valued at $40 million annually.

Florida West Coast is the largest producing state in the Gulf of Mexico region, supplying 91% of all domestically-caught spiny lobster and all of the landings in the Gulf of Mexico region. The Florida East Coast provided most of the remaining balance of the total domestic landings of spiny lobster.

spiny-lobster-landings-annual-GoM
Figure 1. Annual commercial spiny lobster landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Economic Contributions

The economic contribution an industry makes locally, region-wide, nation-wide, or globally is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of spiny lobster in the Gulf of Mexico Region in 2016 reached $39.4 million, which was 2% less than the average yearly dockside values in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial spiny lobster fishing in 2016 amounted to $75.1 million (Figure 2). The spiny lobster commercial fishing sustained 1,043 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $26.9 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The spiny lobster commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. About $4.6 million was estimated to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were expected to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to $2.25 million as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Spiny-lobster-Gulf-economic-contribution
Figure 2. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2016 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set at 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

When Hurricane Irma struck Florida in Sept. 2017, the spiny lobster fishing industry was extensively devastated. The more than 350,000 spiny lobster traps were either destroyed or displaced. Also, fishing boats and equipment, docks, fish houses, and other facilities suffered the destructive forces of the hurricane. The hurricane hit during the very peak of the spiny lobster season (Figure 3). The economic devastation of this natural disaster is massive, and the sector hardest hit are the coastal communities engaged in commercial fishing.

spiny-lobster-landings-monthly-GoM
Figure 3. Monthly distribution of commercial spiny lobster landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

 

 

ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL TO SEAFOOD, AND COMMERCIAL AND RECREATIONAL FISHING

GOMOS

The National Commission on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling (2011) reported that on “April 20, 2010, the Macondo well blew out, costing the lives of 11 men and beginning a catastrophe that sank the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig and spilled nearly 5 million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The spill disrupted an entire region’s economy, damaged fisheries, and critical habitats, and brought vividly to light the risks of deepwater drilling for oil and gas—the latest frontier in the national energy supply.”

The damages to the Gulf of Mexico States (GOM) natural resources due to the 2010 Gulf of Mexico or Deepwater Horizon oil spill (GOMOS) took some time to clean up, and the restoration period to get the resources back to their original pre-GOMOS status is still indefinite. Several restoration projects in affected states are underway (http://www.gulfspillrestoration.noaa.gov/). In the meantime, the production and consumption of goods and services by economic sectors located in the GOM states are adversely affected, leading to a possible reduction in the levels of economic activity, tax revenues, and employment and personal income.

The closures of significant portions of GOM federal and state waters to commercial and saltwater recreational fishing, as well as the closures of beach resources to human uses, due to the GOMOS altered the recreation and consumption decisions of residents and tourists in affected communities. The changes in market perceptions and flow of goods and services generated by the damaged natural resources affected not only households but also communities dependent on these natural resources.

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010 led to closures of significant portions of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) federal and state waters to commercial and recreational fishing and closures of beach resources to human uses. These closures altered the seafood consumption and production decisions of residents and tourists in affected communities. The negative perceptions associated with the oil spill regarding the safety of consuming seafood products from the GOM states has further eroded the region’s share of the domestic seafood markets.

A survey of the direct economic impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on the business operations of participating Mississippi seafood and commercial and saltwater recreational fishing establishments was conducted in 2012. These impacts were measured in terms of the “changes in business operations in 2010 due to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill” in total annual sales, number of workers employed, length of shutdown period and number of claims for financial losses filed and received by participating seafood and marine-related establishments.

The 331 Mississippi marine businesses that participated in the survey contributed between 25% and 65% of the total annual gross sales or total employment in marine economic sectors included in the impact assessment. Oil spill-related closures of state and federal waters adversely impacted the overall business operations of participating establishments, which were shut down, on average, by about 4.21 months. The direct economic impacts of the oil spill on these businesses resulted in a decline in 2010 of almost 50% of the annual total sales and 33% of the total employment as compared with 2009.

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/index.html

Source:**Posadas, B.C. 2015. Economic Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill to Mississippi Seafood, and Commercial and Recreational Fishing Sectors. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Bulletin 1218, Mississippi State, Mississippi.

Horticulture and Marine Economics Programs in 2018

HORTICULTURE ECONOMICS2000-2020 (MONDAY, CREC OR FRIDAY, SHL)
  • Investigate labor management practices and mechanization.
  • Assess economic impacts of research and consumer preferences.
SEAFOOD AND AQUACULTURE PRICES, 1990-2020 (TUESDAY, CREC) 
  • Assess the volatility of ex-vessel and wholesale prices of shrimp and aquaculture products.
  • Develop a methodology for assessing resiliency of labor markets.
ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF RECENT DISASTERS, 1990-2020 (WEDNESDAY, CREC)
  • Develop economic recovery models of marine industries and coastal counties.
ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF MARINE DEBRIS, 2018-2020 (WEDNESDAY, CREC)
  • Assess economic impacts of marine debris on the commercial fishing industry.
MARINE AQUACULTURE PRODUCTION SYSTEMS, 1990-2020 (THURSDAY, CREC, GCRL)
  • Develop economic models for commercial marine culture systems.
  • Pilot-test the assessment methodology in aquatic animal outbreaks.
PRODUCING SURIMI FROM CATFISH BYPRODUCTS, 2018-2020 (FRIDAY, ESPL) 
  • Develop optimization models subject to supply and technological constraints.
DR. POSADAS NEEDS YOUR HELP, 2015-2020 (ONLINE SURVEY)

CLICK THIS LINK TO CONTACT ME

ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE MISSISSIPPI SEAFOOD INDUSTRY IN 2015 BY MAJOR SPECIES AND TYPE

The entire Mississippi shrimp industry contributed a total of $215.4 million, created 4,276 jobs, and generated total personal income of $88.5 million. Processing (38%), retailing (45.9%), landings (9.1%), and wholesaling (6.6%) were the largest components of the state shrimp industry in 2015.

Oysters and crabs were combined in 2015 to prevent the disclosure of confidential data reported by seafood processors in Mississippi. The combined oyster and crab industry added a total of $35 million, created 831 jobs, and generated total personal income of $14.8 million. Retailing (69.7%), processing (11.4%), harvesting (9.7%), and wholesaling (9.1%) were the biggest parts of the state oyster and crab industry in 2015.

The entire finfish industry contributed a total of $215.0 million, created 4,384 jobs, and generated total personal income of $82.6 million. Harvesting (39.1%), retailing (36.0%), and processing (24.2%) were the largest sectors of the state finfish industry in 2015.

SPECIES

Suggested citation: Posadas, Benedict C. Breakdown of the Economic Contributions of the Mississippi Seafood Industry by Major Species in 2015.Mississippi State University Extension Service publication and Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant publication MASGP-171-070. Mississippi State, Mississippi. In press.

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/CONTRIBUTIONS-SPECIES-MS-2015.html

Owners and Workers in Marinas in the Gulf of Mexico States and United States

Marinas are included in the NAICS code 713930. This industry comprises establishments, commonly known as marinas, engaged in operating docking and/or storage facilities for pleasure craft owners, with or without one or more related activities, such as retailing fuel and marine supplies; and repairing, maintaining, or renting pleasure boats.

Marinas
Marinas-Jobs-2
Marinas-JobsMarinage-Gender
Marinas-race
Marinas-age
Source: EMSI.

Posadas, B.C and B.K.A. Posadas, Jr. 2018. Employment, Incomes, and Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Marinas in the Gulf of Mexico and United States. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, 8(1).

**Posadas, B.C. 2015. Economic Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill to Mississippi Seafood, and Commercial and Recreational Fishing Sectors. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Bulletin 1218, Mississippi State, Mississippi.

**Posadas, B.C. and B.K.A. Posadas, Jr. 2013. License and Size Profiles of Mississippi Seafood, and Commercial and Recreational Fishing Sectors. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Bulletin 1206, Mississippi State, Mississippi.

**Posadas, B.C. and B.K.A. Posadas, Jr. 2013. Estimation of the Baseline for the Assessment of the Economic Impacts of the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill to the Mississippi Commercial Fishing Sector. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Bulletin 1204, Mississippi State, Mississippi.

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/msannualmarinas.html

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Marinas in the Gulf of Mexico and United States

Definition of Marinas  

NAICS code 713930 represents the marina industry (https://www.naics.com/). It “comprises establishments, commonly known as marinas, engaged in operating docking and storage facilities for pleasure craft owners, with or without one or more related activities, such as retailing fuel and marine supplies; and repairing, maintaining, or renting pleasure boats.”

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

The marina industry directly provided, on average, 52,788 jobs per year in the United States. (Figure 1). The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 22.6 percent of all the marina jobs during the period. The marina activities in Mississippi and Alabama added 0.4 and 1.3 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

Marinas-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. Annual Employment of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com

 

The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged $34,292 per person (Figure 1). The annual pay of workers and owners in the five Gulf of Mexico States averaged $35,149 per person or 102.7 percent of the national average. Mississippi and Alabama commercial workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 66.3 and 87.1 percent of the national average, respectively.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Jan. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 53.6 percent were males (Figure 2). About 46.4 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, relatively more men worked and owned the marina businesses.

Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Gender. QCEW
Figure 2. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Gender. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The recent industrial overview disseminated by EMSI (Jan. 2018) also categorized the workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 3). Majority of the workers and owners are Whites (80.8%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (8.4%), and African Americans (6.4%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer Whites, more Hispanic and African Americans are engaged in the marina business.

Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Race or Ethnicity
Figure 3. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Race or Ethnicity. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview published by EMSI (Jan. 2018) also classified the workers and owners by age (Figure 4). More than two out of 10 of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The 45-55 years old workers and owners consisted of 21.5 percent of the total. The 35-44 years old group added 19.7 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners comprise the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are relatively older than the national average.

Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Age.
Figure 4. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Age. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com

MULTI-YEAR BASELINE ECONOMIC INFORMATION ABOUT MARINE SECTORS IN ALL FIVE GULF STATES

GomosLogo

In order to understand the magnitude and duration of the long-term individual and joint economic impacts of recent natural and technological disasters to recreational and commercial fishing, aquaculture, horticulture and marine sectors, multi-year baseline economic information about each sector in all five Gulf states are currently being compiled from various secondary sources.

Visit the website at http://gomos.msstate.edu/index.html

Most Valued Commercial Species in the Gulf of Mexico

Commercial fishing comprises establishments primarily engaged in the commercial catching or taking of finfish, shellfish, or miscellaneous marine products from a natural habitat (U.S. Bureau of Census).During the past seven years, the Gulf States landed an average 1.5 billion pounds of commercially harvestable fish and shellfish species representing about 15 percent of the total U.S. landings. The dockside values of commercial landings in the Gulf States averaged $890 million per year (at constant 2016 prices) since 2010 representing 16 percent of the overall domestic landing values.

The top 10 most valued species commercially landed in the Gulf of Mexico States are shrimp, menhaden, oyster, crabs, spiny lobster, red snapper and red grouper (Figure 1).

Top-Ten-Species-Gulf-2016
Figure 1. Top 10 Most Valued Species Commercially Harvested in the Gulf of Mexico States Exceeding $18 Million in 2016. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/commercial-fisheries/index. Last accessed: Jan. 10, 2018.

Read more at http://masgc.org/news/article/know-more-about-the-commercial-fishermen-in-the-gulf-of-mexico-states

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you all!

Christmas_SM_EXT(1)

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you all! (English)
Maligayang Pasko at Manigong Bagong Taon sa lahat! (Filipino)
Malipayong Pasko ug Bulahang Bag-ong Tuig sa tanan! (Cebuano)
Selamat Hari Natal Dyuga Dan Selamat Tahun Baru! (Bahasa)
Madyaw nga Pasko ug mangyat nga pagsuog hong Bag-o nga tuig! (Butuan)
Marajaw na pasko sa ijo na tanan! (Surigaonon)
Madayaw na Pasko asta Bag-o na Tuig puhon sa iyo! (Tandag)
Mele Kalikimaka e Hauoli Makahiki Hou! (Hawaiian)
Feliz Navidad y una Feliz Año Nuevo a cada uno! (Spanish)
Vrolijke Kerstmis en een Gelukkig Nieuw Jaar aan iedereen! (Dutch)
Joyeux Noël et une nouvelle année heureuse à chacun ! (French)
Frohe Weihnachten und ein glückliches neues Jahr zu jeder! (German)
Christmas alegre e um ano novo feliz a todos! (Portuguese)
Felixes Pascua y muy Prosperos Anio Nuevo a todos ! (Chavacano)

AVERAGE PRODUCTIVITY OF COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN, 2000-2016

productivity-average-fisherman-MS

Sources of raw data: NOAA Fisheries and EMSI.
Legend: lbs/worker = commercial landings (lbs) / no. of commercial fishermen; $/worker1 = commercial landing values ($) / no. of commercial fishermen; $/worker2 = commercial landing values ($/CPI) / no. of commercial fishermen.

productivity-average-fisherman-USA

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/index.html.

 

 

 

MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM SEPTEMBER 1995 TO SEPTEMBER 2017

ShrimpLandingsALSeptemberShrimpLandingsMSSeptemberShrimpLandingsGulfSeptember

Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html 

MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM AUGUST 1995 TO AUGUST 2017

ShrimpLandingsMSAugustShrimpLandingsGulfAugust

Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html  

MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM JULY 1995 TO JULY 2017

ShrimpLandingsGulfJulyShrimpLandingsMSJuly

Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html  

U.S. per capita seafood consumption, 1950-2016

per-capita-seafood-consumption
Annual per capita consumption of seafood products represents the pounds of edible meat consumed from domestically-caught and imported fish and shellfish adjusted for beginning and ending inventories and exports, divided by the civilian population of the United States as of July 1 of each year.  NOAA Fisheries (2017).

MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM JUNE 1995 TO JUNE 2017

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Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html  

MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM MAY 1995 TO MAY 2017

 

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Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html 

MONTHLY SHRIMP LANDINGS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM APRIL 1995 TO APRIL 2017

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Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting. 

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landing-monthly.html