Commercial Rock Shrimp Fishing

Commercial Landings

The long-term commercial landings of rock shrimp (Fig.1) harvested from the Gulf of Mexico Region are shown in Fig. 2. The commercial landings databases are compiled from the NOAA Fisheries website. On average, about 708,000 pounds of rock shrimp were landed each year, valued at $1.72 million annually, during the past six years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Figure 1. Brown rock shrimp (Sicyonia brevirostris). Source: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/species/brown-rock-shrimp. Last visited: May 28, 2019.

Since 2011, the Gulf of Mexico states provided most of the domestic market for rock shrimp. The domestic market share of the Gulf rock shrimp fishery rose from 69.5 percent in 2011 to 100 percent in 2016.  

In 2016, Florida West Coast landed 80 percent of the domestic landings of rock shrimp. Alabama harvested 13 percent. Texas and Mississippi produced six and one percent, respectively.

The dockside prices (EVP) of rock shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico states averaged about $2.41 per pound during the past six years. The ex-vessel prices were deflated by the consumer price index (2016=100). The average EVP of rock shrimp in the entire United States averaged slightly lower at $2.22 per pound during the past six years after the oil spill.

Figure 2. Commercial landings of rock shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico region. The primary vertical axis shows the yearly commercial landings in pounds. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/. Last visited: May 28, 2019.

MarketMaker Seafood Businesses

In 2016, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of rock shrimp reached 480,289 pounds with dockside values about $1,166.981. Rock shrimp are harvested year-round with peaks between May and September. More than 12,000 businesses which catch, process, and sell seafood products are registered in MarketMaker nationwide. There are more than 200 businesses which promote their seafood products and services in Mississippi MarketMaker.

To search for seafood businesses in MarketMaker, perform the following procedures:

  1. Go to https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/
  2. Click “search” and type “Seafood” in the product box.
  3. You can sort the search results by relevance and name.
  4. You can also limit online searches by state, and type of business.

Economic Contributions

The economic contribution that the commercial rock shrimp fishing makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used in creating the regional economic model of commercial fishing in the Gulf of Mexico in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of rock shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $1.166 million, which was about 68 percent of the average dockside values in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial rock shrimp fishing in 2016 reached $2.227. This output of goods and service created by the rock shrimp commercial fishing and related industries supported 31 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $0.798 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The rock shrimp commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. It was estimated that more than $136,000 would have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to more than $66,700 in social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Read more:

Posadas, Benedict C., and Amanda E. Jefferson. Commercial rock shrimp fishing. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 9, No. 5. May 29, 2019. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Wholesale margins over dockside prices of Gulf shrimp rising


The ratio of the wholesale prices over dockside prices of Gulf of Mexico white shrimp, 16-20 count per pound continued to rise since 1998. In recent years, the ratio was about 1.40, which indicates that wholesale prices were about 40 percent higher than dockside prices.

The ratio of the wholesale prices over dockside prices of Gulf of Mexico white shrimp, 21-25 count per pound continued to increase since 1998. In recent years, the ratio was about 1.40, which indicates that wholesale prices were about 40 percent more than dockside prices.

WHOLESALE PRICES
Wholesale prices are UB Shrimp, Wild, Gulf of Mexico, Domestic White, in dollars per pound. The ex-warehouse prices ($/lb) are prices reported by the Urner Barry Comtell of the wild GOM white shrimp (P. setiferus) species traded in the West Coast or East Coast.

DOCKSIDE PRICES
Dockside or ex-vessel prices are in dollars per pound, Penaied species only, headless.  Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;  Count – number of shrimp per pound. Ex-vessel prices ($/lb) are the prices reported by NOAA Fisheries of Penaeid shrimp species landed by the commercial fishing sector in the northern GOM states.  

WHOLESALE MARGINS
The height of the ratio above 1.00 shows the gross margins of the wholesale prices over the dockside prices of the specified shrimp product harvested from the Gulf of Mexico. Over time, the ratio between the two prices increased consistently to more than 1.40 in recent years.

It should be noted that the GOM dockside prices cover all Penaeid shrimp species while the GOM wholesale prices refer only to GOM white shrimp (P. setiferus).

The margins rose to around $2.50 per pound of the Gulf of Mexico white shrimp, 10-20 count during the past few years. In recent years, the margin was about $2.50, which means that wholesale prices were about $2.50 per pound more than dockside prices.

The margins rose to about $2.50 per pound of the Gulf of Mexico white shrimp, 21-25 count during the recent years. In recent years, the margin was about $2.50, which means that wholesale prices were about $2.50 per pound more than dockside prices.

Employment, Incomes, and Economic Contributions of Aquaculture.

U. S. Aquaculture Industry

U.S. aquaculture includes finfish farming and fish hatcheries, shellfish farming, and other aquaculture (https://www.naics.com/). The “finfish farming and fish hatcheries” industry comprise establishments primarily engaged in farm raising finfish (e.g., catfish, trout, goldfish, tropical fish, minnows) and hatching fish of any kind. The “shellfish farming” industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in farm raising shellfish (e.g., crayfish, shrimp, oysters, clams, mollusks). The “other aquaculture” industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in farm raising of aquatic animals (except finfish and shellfish) and farm raising of aquatic plants. Alligator, algae, frog, seaweed, or turtle production is included in this industry.

Aquaculture Employment, Wages, and Salaries

Figure 1. U.S. and Gulf of Mexico States annual employment of QCEW employees. Source of raw data:U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics,Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

The U.S. aquaculture industry directly created more than 6,000 jobs per year in the United States since 2001 (Figure 1). All the Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed less than one-third of all the jobs during the period. These jobs only involve those that were included in the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) survey. Due to the lack of available data, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors engaged in the aquaculture industry were not included. Aquaculture activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added an average of 13 and 2 percent of the total number of QCEW jobs, respectively (Fig. 2). The number of QCEW jobs directly created by the aquaculture industry in the two states declined consistently starting in 2008.

Figure 2. Mississippi and Alabama annual employment of QCEW employees. Source of raw data:U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics,Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

The combined wages and salaries of all the QCEW employees averaged more than $30,000 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 3). The annual earnings of workers in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged more than $35,000 per person or 117 percent of the national average. During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama QCEW workers received average annual pay amounting to 88 and 100 percent of the national average, respectively.

Figure 3. U.S. annual employment, wages, and salaries of QCEW employees. Source of raw data:U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics,Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Aquaculture Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

More than 80 local fish farms registered their business profiles in MarketMaker (Fig. 4). Click this LINK to view the search results online. You can sort the results alphabetically, by state or relevance.  To search for fish farms in MarketMaker, perform the following procedures:

  1. Go to https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/
  2. Type “fish farm” in the search box.
  3. You can sort the search results by relevance and name.
  4. You can also limit online searches by state.

Figure 4. Local fish farms which registered their business profiles in MarketMaker. Source: https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/. Last accessed: April 17, 2019.

Aquaculture Makes Significant Contributions to the Gulf Regional Economy

The economic contribution that aquaculture makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of aquaculture to the regional economy in 2012.

The economic contribution analysis used sector 14 or ‘animal production, except cattle and poultry and egg” of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.  Due to the lack of reliable data, the contributions of aquaculture processing, wholesaling, and retailing to the regional economy were excluded in the present analysis.

Figure 4. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using the 2012 Census of Aquaculture total value of aquaculture products sold and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set at 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.  

The total value of aquaculture products sold by 1,371 fish farms in the Gulf of Mexico States in 2012 reached more than $553 million (Fig. 4). Overall, the IMPLAN model estimates that the Gulf aquaculture industry supported 14,943 direct jobs in the region in 2012 (Fig. 5). This IMPLAN employment estimate is about 9.167 times the QCEW employment estimate reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) in 2012. As mentioned earlier, these differences could be explained by the exclusion of non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors in the BLS estimates.

The total output contribution of the Gulf aquaculture industry in 2012 amounted to more than $870 million. The Gulf aquaculture industry generated labor income amounting to over $181 million and supported over 17,400 jobs in the regional economy in 2012 (Fig. 5). The aquaculture industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf states and the U.S. federal government. More than $48 million was projected to have been paid by households and businesses in 2012 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf of Mexico states were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2012 amounting to more than $6 million as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Promote your Aquaculture Products in Season

As a member of MarketMaker, you can promote your food products and services in season at the MarketMaker BUY or SELL Forum. Registration in MarketMaker in the state where your business is located is FREE and simple. Email me at ben.posadas@msstate.edu for assistance.

You can view the current listing of products posted at the MarketMaker BUY or SELL Forum at https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/marketplace/category/2 (Fig. 8).

Suggested Citation:
Posadas, B.C. 2019. Employment, Incomes, and Economic Contributions of Aquaculture. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 9, No. 4.  
http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker

Wholesale margins over dockside prices of Gulf shrimp


The height of the ratio above 1.00 shows the margins of the wholesale prices over the dockside prices of the specified shrimp product harvested from the Gulf of Mexico.
It should be noted that the GOM dockside prices cover all Penaeid shrimp species while the GOM wholesale prices refer only to GOM white shrimp (P. setiferus).


Wholesale prices are UB Shrimp, Wild, Gulf of Mexico, Domestic White, 21-25 count, in dollars per pound.   The ex-warehouse prices ($/lb) are prices reported by the Urner Barry Comtell of the wild GOM white shrimp (P. setiferus) species traded in the West Coast or East Coast.

Ex-vessel prices are in dollars per pound, Penaied species only, headless.  Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Ex-vessel prices ($/lb) are the prices reported by NOAA Fisheries of Penaeid shrimp species landed by the commercial fishing sector in the northern GOM states. 

Legend: Northern – Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;  UB – Urner Barry ;  Count – number of shrimp per pound. 

Posadas, Benedict C. and Benedict Kit A. Posadas, Jr. 2011. Baseline Monthly Prices of Wild Gulf of Mexico Penaeid Shrimp Species, 2005-2011. Gulf Oil Spill Assessment Marine Sector Monthly Report. Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center, Biloxi, Mississippi.

For the Gulf of Mexico Monthly Shrimp Landings (click this link).

For the Gulf of Mexico Monthly Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices (click this link).

Commercial Red Drum Fishing

The commercial harvest and sale of red drum is prohibited in Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, and Florida state waters and Gulf federal waters. As a result, Mississippi accounts for all commercial red drum landings in the Gulf (Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Commercial landings and dockside values. The primary vertical axis shows the yearly commercial landings in pounds while the secondary vertical axis indicates the annual commercial dockside values in dollars. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/. Last visited: February 5, 2019.

Red drum (sciaenops ocellatus) are also known as channel bass, redfish, reds, spottail bass (Fig. 2).

Figure 2. Red drum (sciaenops ocellatus). Illustration by Joe Jewell.

Fig. 3 shows the commercial landings of red drum harvested from the Gulf of Mexico Region since 1950. The commercial landings databases are compiled from the NOAA Fisheries website. On average, about 44,339 pounds of red drum were landed each year from 2010 to 2016.

Figure 3

Almost all of the domestic supply of red drum was harvested from the Gulf states between 1950 and 1988 (Fig. 4). Since 2010, however, Mississippi supplies 28 percent of total domestic landings, while 68 percent are landed from North Carolina.

Figure 4

The dockside prices of red drum in the Gulf of Mexico states have been rising during the past seven years, averaging about $2.15 per pound (Fig. 5).

Figure 5

Fig. 6-7 show the commercial landings of red drum harvested from the North Carolina and the entire United States since 1950.

Figure 6.
Figure 7

Economic Contribution of Commercial Spanish Mackerel Fishing

Figure 1. Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus maculatus). Source: Mississippi Saltwater Fish. Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, Biloxi, Mississippi. Illustration by Joe Jewell.

Commercial Landings

The long-term annual commercial Spanish mackerel landings in the Gulf of Mexico states are shown in Fig. 3. Since 2011, the Gulf supplied 28.6% of the total Spanish mackerel domestic landings (Fig. 4) averaging 1.29 million pounds and valued at $1.20 million annually.

In 2016, Alabama (19.0%) and Florida West Coast (11.6%) were the most significant suppliers from the Gulf of Mexico with some landings from Louisiana (0.19%, Fig. 5). The bulk of the Spanish mackerel was landed in Florida East Coast (54.6%). North Carolina landed 13.3%, and the rest was harvested in other Atlantic states.

Figure 3. Commercial landings and dockside values of Spanish mackerel in the Gulf of Mexico region. The primary vertical axis shows the yearly commercial landings in pounds while the secondary vertical axis indicates the annual commercial dockside values in dollars. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/. Last visited: December 20, 2018.

Figure 4. The vertical axis shows the percent of Gulf of Mexico to United States commercial landings of Spanish mackerel. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/. Last visited: December 20, 2018.


Figure 5. The pie chart shows the 2016 percent distribution of commercial landings of Spanish mackerel by producing states. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/. Last visited: December 20, 2018.


Figure 6. The vertical axis shows the average yearly dockside prices of Spanish mackerel since 1990 in dollars per pound. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/. Last visited: December 20, 2018.

The dockside prices of Spanish mackerel in the Gulf of Mexico states averaged about $0.97 per pound during the past six years (Fig. 6). The ex-vessel prices were deflated by the consumer price index (2016=100).


Figure 7. The vertical axis shows the monthly commercial landings of Spanish mackerel in pounds in 2014-2016. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/. Last visited: December 20, 2018.

MarketMaker Seafood Businesses

In 2016, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of Spanish mackerel reached more than 1.39 million pounds with dockside values of $1.34 million. Spanish mackerel are harvested year-round (Fig. 7). More than 12,000 businesses which catch, process, and sell seafood products are registered in MarketMaker nationwide. There are more than 200 businesses which promote their seafood products and services in Mississippi MarketMaker.

To search for seafood businesses in MarketMaker, perform the following procedures:

  1. Go to https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/
  2. Click “search” and type “Seafood” in the product box.
  3. You can sort the search results by relevance and name.
  4. You can also limit online searches by state, and type of business.

Economic Contributions

The economic contribution that the commercial Spanish mackerel fishing makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used in creating the regional economic model of commercial fishing in the Gulf of Mexico in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of Spanish mackerel in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $1.3 million, which was 11.5% more than the average dockside values in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial Spanish mackerel fishing in 2016 reached $2.6 million (Fig. 8). This output of goods and service created by the Spanish mackerel commercial fishing and related industries supported 36 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $0.9 million in the Gulf regional economy.


Figure 8. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2016 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set at 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

The Spanish mackerel commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. It was projected that more than $156,000 would have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to more than $76,000 in social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Read more at:

Posadas, Benedict C., and Amanda E. Jefferson. Economic contribution of Commercial Spanish mackerel fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 9, No. 1. January 8, 2019. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Gulf commercial fishermen harvest Blue catfish and contribute to the regional economy

Virginia-Fishes-Blue-Catfish

Figure 1. Blue catfish (Ictalurusfurcatus). Source: Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries. https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/fish/blue-catfish/. Last visited: November 30, 2018.  

Since 2011, the Gulf supplied 57.8% of the total Blue catfish domestic landings averaging 3.6 million pounds and valued at $1.8 million annually.  In 2016, Louisiana(45.7%) and Texas (0.9%) were the most significant suppliers from the Gulf of Mexico. The rest of the Blue catfish was landed in Virginia (34.9%). Maryland landed 18.4%, and North Carolina added 0.2% to domestic landings.

The dockside prices of Blue catfish in the Gulf of Mexico states averaged about $0.52 per pound during the past six years. The ex-vessel prices were deflated by the consumer price index (2016=100). 

In 2016, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of Blue catfish reached more than 3.7 million pounds with dockside values of $1.9 million. Blue catfish are harvested year-round. More than 12,000 businesses which catch, process, and sell seafood products are registered in MarketMaker nationwide. There are more than 200 businesses which promote their seafood products and services in Mississippi MarketMaker.

To search for seafood businesses in MarketMaker, perform the following procedures:

  1. Go to https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/
  2. Click “search” and type “Seafood” in the product box.
  3. You can sort the search results by relevance and name.
  4. You can also limit online searches by state, and type of business.

The economic contribution that the commercial Blue catfish fishing makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used in creating the regional economic model of commercial fishing in the Gulf of Mexico in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of Blue catfish in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $1.9 million, which was 3.5% more than the average yearly dockside values in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial Blue catfish fishing in 2016 amounted to $3.7 million. This output of goods and service created by the Blue catfish commercial fishing and related industries sustained 51 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $1.3 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The Blue catfish commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S.federal government. It was projected that more than $230,000 would have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports,corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to more than $112,000 in social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Read more:

Posadas, Benedict C., and Amanda E. Jefferson. Commercial Blue catfish fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 17. Novermber 30, 2018. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Economic Contributions of Commercial Yellowedge Grouper Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

Yellowedge-Grouper
Figure 1. Yellowedge Grouper (Hyporthodus flavolimbatus). Source: South Atlantic Fishery Management Council. https://safmc.net/regulations/regulations-by-species/yellowedge-grouper-2/. Last visited: October 12, 2018.

grouper-yellowedge-landings-year-gom
Figure 2. Commercial landings and dockside values of Yellowedge grouper in the Gulf of Mexico region since 1985. The primary vertical axis shows the yearly commercial landings in pounds while the secondary vertical axis indicates the annual commercial dockside values in dollars. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: October 3, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

The long-term annual commercial Yellowedge grouper landings in the Gulf of Mexico states starting in 1985 are shown in Fig. 2. Since 2011, the Gulf supplied 97.9% of the total Yellowedge grouper domestic landings averaging 806,000 pounds and valued at $3.1 million annually. In 2016, Florida West Coast (54.3%), Texas (37.9%), and Louisiana (6%) were the most significant suppliers from the Gulf of Mexico. The rest of the Yellowedge grouper was landed in Florida East Coast (0.7%). South Carolina landed 0.6%, and North Carolina added 0.6% to domestic landings. Dockside prices of Yellowedge grouper in the Gulf of Mexico states averaged about $3.93 per pound during the past six years (Fig. 6). The ex-vessel prices were deflated by the consumer price index (2016=100).

In 2016, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of Yellowedge grouper reached more than 842,000 pounds with dockside values of $3.39 million. Yellowedge grouper are harvested year-round. More than 12,000 businesses which catch, process, and sell seafood products are registered in MarketMaker nationwide. There are more than 200 businesses which promote their seafood products and services in Mississippi MarketMaker.

To search for seafood businesses in MarketMaker, perform the following procedures:

  1. Go to https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/
  2. Click “search” and type “Seafood” in the product box.
  3. You can sort the search results by relevance and name.
  4. You can also limit online searches by state, and type of business.

The economic contribution that the commercial Yellowedge grouper fishing makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used in creating the regional economic model of commercial fishing in the Gulf of Mexico in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of Yellowedge grouper in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $3.39 million, which was 9.33% more than the average yearly dockside values in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial Yellowedge grouper fishing in 2016 amounted to $6.47 million. This output of goods and service created by the Yellowedge grouper commercial fishing and related industries sustained 90 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $2.32 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The Yellowedge grouper commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. It was projected that more than $396,000 would have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to more than $193,000 in social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Read more at : 

Posadas, Benedict C., and Amanda E. Jefferson. Commercial Yellowedge grouper fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 16. October 23, 2018. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

 

Economic Contributions of Commercial Vermillion Snapper Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

Snapper-Vermilion-NOAA
Figure 1. Vermilion snapper (Rhomboplites aurorubens). Source: NOAA Fisheries. https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/species/vermilion-snapper. Last visited: October 3, 2018. 

The long-term annual commercial Vermilion snapper landings in the Gulf of Mexico states are shown in Fig. 2. Since 2011, the Gulf supplied 66.47% of the total Vermilion snapper domestic landings averaging 1.93 million pounds and valued at $5.23 million annually.

snapper-vermillion-landings-year-gom
Figure 2. Commercial landings and dockside values of Vermilion snapper in the Gulf of Mexico region. The primary vertical axis shows the yearly commercial landings in pounds while the secondary vertical axis indicates the annual commercial dockside values in dollars. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: October 3, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/

In 2015 and 2016, Florida West Coast (38%), Louisiana (12%), and Texas (11%) were the most significant suppliers from the Gulf of Mexico (Fig. 5). The rest of the Vermilion snapper was landed in Florida East Coast (14%), South Carolina landed 13%, and North Carolina added 11% to domestic landings.

Dockside prices of Vermilion snapper in the Gulf of Mexico states averaged about $2.82 per pound during the past six years. The ex-vessel prices were deflated by the consumer price index (2016=100).

The economic contribution that the commercial Vermilion snapper fishing makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used in creating the regional economic model of commercial fishing in the Gulf of Mexico in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of Vermilion snapper in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $4.10 million, which was 22% less than the average yearly dockside values in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial Vermilion snapper fishing in 2016 amounted to $7.8 million (Fig. 3). This output of goods and service created by the Vermilion snapper commercial fishing and related industries sustained 109 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $2.8 million in the Gulf regional economy.

Snapper-vermillion-Gulf-economic-contribution
Figure 3. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2016 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set at 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

The Vermilion snapper commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. It was projected that about $480,000 would have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to about $235,000 in social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Read more at Posadas, Benedict C., and Amanda E. Jefferson. Commercial Vermilion snapper fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 15, October 9, 2018. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

 

Economic Contributions of Commercial Yellowfin Tuna Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

tuna_hres

Figure 1. Yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares). Source: Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Service. Last visited: September 14, 2018. https://www.freshfromflorida.com/es/Divisions-Offices/Marketing-and-Development/Consumer-Resources/Buy-Fresh-From-Florida/Seafood-Products/Yellowfin-Tuna.

 

The long-term annual commercial yellowfin tuna landings in the Gulf of Mexico states are shown in Fig. 2. Since 2011, the Gulf supplied 8% of the total yellowfin tuna domestic landings averaging 1.7 million pounds and valued at $6.4 million annually. In 2016, Louisiana (13.9%) and Florida West Coast (4.5%) were the most significant suppliers from the Gulf of Mexico. The bulk of the Yellowfin tuna was landed in Hawaii (56.8%). California landed 9.8%, and North Carolina added 8.0% to domestic landings. Dockside prices of Yellowfin tuna in the Gulf of Mexico states averaged about $3.87 per pound during the past six years.

yellowtail-tuna-landings-year-gom
Figure 2. Commercial landings and dockside values of yellowfin tuna in the Gulf of Mexico region. The primary vertical axis shows the yearly commercial landings in pounds while the secondary vertical axis indicates the annual commercial dockside values in dollars. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: September 14, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

 

The economic contribution that the commercial Yellowfin tuna fishing makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used in creating the regional economic model of commercial fishing in the Gulf of Mexico in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of Yellowfin tuna in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $5.6 million, which was 14.6% less than the average yearly dockside values in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial Yellowfin tuna fishing in 2016 amounted to $10.7 million (Fig. 3). This output of goods and service created by the Yellowfin tuna commercial fishing and related industries sustained 149 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $3.8 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The Yellowfin tuna commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. More than $657,000 was projected to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to more than $320,000 as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

 

Tuna-yellowfin-Gulf-economic-contribution
Figure 3. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2016 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set at 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

For more information, go to:

Posadas, Benedict C., and Amanda E. Jefferson. Commercial yellowfin tuna fishing in the Gulf of Mexico states. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 14, September 24, 2018. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

 

Economic Contribution of Commercial Gag Grouper Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

IMG_E0197
Figure 1. Gag grouper (Mycteroperca microlepis). Illustration by Joe Jewell. Mississippi Saltwater Fish. Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, Biloxi, Mississippi.

Commercial Landings

The long-term commercial gag grouper landings in the Gulf of Mexico states are shown in Fig. 2. Since 2011, the Gulf of Mexico states supplied about 63 percent of the total gag grouper domestic landings. The east and west coasts of Florida supplied about 72 percent of the total domestic landings during the past six years. Fig. 3 shows the average dockside prices of gag grouper in the Gulf of Mexico.

landings-year-gag-grouper-gom
Figure 2. The primary vertical axis shows the yearly commercial landings in pounds while the secondary vertical axis indicates the annual commercial dockside values in dollars. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: August 30, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

evp-year-gag-grouper-gom
Figure 3. The vertical axis shows the average yearly dockside prices (deflated by the consumer price index) in dollars per pound. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: August 30, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

Economic Contributions

The economic contribution commercial gag grouper fishing makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of gag grouper in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $4.7 million, which was 88% more than the average yearly dockside values in the region from 2011 to 2015. The total output contribution of commercial Gag grouper fishing in 2016 amounted to $9.0 million (Fig. 4). This output of goods and service created by the gag grouper commercial fishing and related industries sustained 126 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $3.2 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The gag grouper commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. More than $548,000 was projected to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to almost $268,000 as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Gag-grouper-Gulf-economic-contribution
Figure 4. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2016 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set at 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

For more information, go to:

Posadas, Benedict C., and Amanda E. Jefferson. Commercial gag grouper fishing in the Gulf of Mexico states. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 13, August 30, 2018. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

July shrimp dockside prices in the Gulf of Mexico region from 1995 to 2018

shrimp-evo-ngom

The prices shown above are official data from NOAA Fisheries. The charts show the dockside prices of various shrimp products landed in the five Gulf of Mexico states from Jan. 2013 to July 2018. The vertical or Y-axis shows the ex-vessel prices expressed in dollars per pound of headless shrimp. The ex-vessel prices of shrimp products in heads-on forms are much lower than those reported prices. You need the yield ratio from heads on to headless forms in order to convert those prices. The horizontal or X-axis shows the month and year the shrimp products were landed.

shrimp-evp-wgom

All prices are in dollars per pound. Penaeid species only, headless. The source of raw data is the NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. The following legends are used: Eastern – Florida West Coast (no recent price data are available), Northern – Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and Western – Texas, and Count – the number of shrimps per pound.

July shrimp landings in the Gulf of Mexico region from 1995 to 2018

july-shrimp-gom
Around 7.9 million pounds (headless) of all Penaeid shrimp species were landed in all five Gulf of Mexico states in July 2018, which was 19 percent less than the average landings since after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The July shrimp landings in the entire Gulf region since 2011 averaged 9.7 million pounds. The landings shown above are official data from NOAA Fisheries. The charts show the July landings of various shrimp products in the five Gulf of Mexico states from July 1995 to July 2018. The vertical or Y-axis shows the number of pounds of shrimp landed expressed in pounds of headless shrimp. The pounds of shrimp products in heads-on forms are much higher than those reported pounds. You need the yield ratio from heads-on to headless forms in order to convert those values. The horizontal or X-axis shows the year the shrimp products were landed.

ms-shimp

Around 0.487 million pounds (headless) of all Penaeid shrimp species were landed in Mississippi in July 2018, which was 40 percent less than the average landings since after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The July shrimp landings in Mississippi since 2011 averaged 0.807 million pounds.

shrimp-alabama

Around 2.177 million pounds (headless) of all Penaeid shrimp species were landed in Alabama in July 2018, which was 108 percent more than the average landings since after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The July shrimp landings in Alabama since 2011 averaged 1.045 million pounds.

shrimo-la

Around 1.269 million pounds (headless) of all Penaeid shrimp species were landed in Louisiana in July 2018, which was 64 percent less than the average landings since after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The July shrimp landings in Louisiana since 2011 averaged 3.55 million pounds.

shrimp-tx

Around 3.865 million pounds (headless) of all Penaeid shrimp species were landed in Texas in July 2018, which was 4 percent less than the average landings since after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The July shrimp landings in Texas since 2011 averaged 4.015 million pounds.

shrimp-flwc

Around 0.126 million pounds (headless) of all Penaeid shrimp species were landed in Florida West Coast in July 2018, which was 64 percent less than the average landings since after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The July shrimp landings in Florida West Coast since 2011 averaged 0.352 million pounds. 

Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless).
Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting.

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/shrimp-landings-monthly-July.html.

Crawfish Fishing Makes Significant Contributions to the Gulf Regional Economy

Gulf Commercial Landings Provided Eight Percent of Total Domestic Crawfish Supply

The long-term annual commercial crawfish landings in the Gulf of Mexico states are shown in Fig. 1. Since 2011, Louisiana supplied 100% of the entire domestic crawfish landings averaging 11.8 million pounds and valued at $11.9 million annually.

Crawfish-annual-landings-GoM
Figure 1. Annual commercial crawfish landings in the Gulf of Mexico states. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

The apparent equation for the crawfish supply in the United States is expressed as follows: Total supply = domestic landings + domestic farm production+ imports – exports. Fig. 2 shows the long-term commercial landings and farm production of crawfish. Since 2011, the total landings and production of domestic crawfish averaged 130 million pounds per year with dockside and farm-gate value averaging $188 million per year. The contribution of commercial landings to total domestic pounds averaged about 8 percent with the remaining more significant portion (92%) coming from crawfish ponds mostly in Louisiana and some in Texas.

Crawfish-annual-landings-production-USA
Figure 2. Annual commercial crawfish landings and farm production in the United States. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

Crawfish Dockside Prices Versus Farm-gate Prices

The imputed annual crawfish prices at the dockside and farm-gate levels are shown in Fig. 3. These prices are deflated by the consumer price index (CPI) with 2016 as the base year. Since 2011, the imputed annual prices for the crawfish at the dockside level averaged $1.11 per pound. The imputed farm-gate prices of farmed crawfish averaged $1.55 per pound. These price differentials between wild and farmed crawfish are significant, averaging 40 percent during the past five years.

Crawfish-annual-dockside-farmgate-prices-USA
Figure 3. Imputed annual dockside and farm-gate prices of commercial crawfish harvest and farm production in the United States. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

Crawfish-annual-dockside-values-GoM
Figure 4. Annual commercial crawfish dockside values in the Gulf of Mexico States. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

Seafood Businesses that are Registered in MarketMaker

In 2016, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of crawfish reached 13.6 million pounds with dockside values of $11.9 million. Crawfish are harvested from the wild during spring months (Fig. 5). Farmed crawfish are typically harvested from late fall to spring.

Crawfish-monthly-landings-GoM
Figure 5. Monthly commercial crawfish landings in the Gulf of Mexico states. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

Economic Contributions to the Gulf Regional Economy

The economic contribution that commercial crawfish fishing makes region-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The total commercial dockside value of crawfish harvested in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $11.9 million, which was about the average yearly dockside value in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial crawfish fishing in 2016 amounted to $22.7 million (Fig. 6). The commercial crawfish fishing supported 315 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $8.1 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The crawfish commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf states and the U.S. federal government. More than $1.3 million was projected to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf of Mexico states were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to almost $680,000 as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Crawfish-fishing-economic-contribution-GoM
Figure 6. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2016 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set at 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

Read more at Posadas, Benedict C., and Amanda E. Jefferson. Commercial crawfish fishing in the Gulf of Mexico states. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 11, July 25, 2018. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Charter Boat for-Hire in the Gulf of Mexico and United States

Definition of Charter Boat for-Hire

Scenic and Sightseeing Transportation, Water (NAICS 487210) code includes charter boat for-hire (https://www.naics.com/). The “Scenic and Sightseeing Transportation, Water” industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing scenic and sightseeing transportation on water. The services provided are usually local and involve same-day return to the place of origin. Some illustrative examples include airboat (i.e., swamp buggy) operation, excursion boat operation, charter fishing boat services, harbor sightseeing tours, dinner cruises.”

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

The industry directly created, on average, 21,868 jobs per year in the United States since 2001 (Figure 1). All the Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 23 percent of all the jobs during the period. The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.5 and 0.7 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged $35,937 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1). The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged $35,927 per person or 99.9 percent of the national average. During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 78.3 and 77 percent of the national average, respectively.

U.S. Employment & Wages, Salaries & Earnings in Charter Boats for-Hire
Figure 1. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

 

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Jan. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 65.6 percent were males (Figure 2). About 34.4 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, relatively more men owned and worked at these businesses.

Socio-demographic Characteristics of workers and owners of charter boats for-hire.
Figure 2. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Gender. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

 

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Jan. 2018) also grouped workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 3). Majority of the workers and owners are White (74%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (10.7%), and African American (7.6%). In the Gulf States, relatively more White, Hispanic and African American, and fewer Asian are engaged in these businesses.

Socio-demographic characteristics of workers and owners of charter boats for-hire.
Figure 3. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Race or Ethnicity. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com

 

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview published by EMSI (Jan. 2018) also classified workers and owners by age (Figure 4). More than three out of 10 of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The 45-55 years old workers and owners consisted of 15.9 percent of the total. The 35-44 years old group added 18.4 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners comprise 35.1 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are relatively older than the national average.

Socio-demographic characteristics of Workers and owners of charter boats for-hire.
Figure 4. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Age. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Fruit and Vegetable Canning, Pickling, and Drying Businesses

Definition of Fruit and Vegetable Canning, Pickling, and Drying

Fruit and vegetable canning, pickling, and drying (NAICS 31142) include “establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing canned, pickled, and dried fruits, vegetables, and specialty foods. Establishments in this industry may package the dried or dehydrated ingredients they make with other purchased ingredients. Examples of products are canned juices; canned baby foods; canned soups (except seafood); canned dry beans; canned tomato-based sauces, such as catsup, salsa, chili sauce, spaghetti sauce, barbeque sauce, and tomato paste; pickles and relishes; jams and jellies; dried soup mixes and bouillon; and sauerkraut.” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html)

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

The overall trend in the number of jobs in the industry has been downward. On average the industry directly created more than 91,000 jobs per year in the United States since 2001 (Figure 1). All the Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 9.3 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 2). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.24 and 0.17 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States has been slowly rising over the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged $61,544 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1).

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been declining more frequently during the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged $63,776 per person or 103.7 percent of the national average (Figure 2). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 62.7 and 62.4 percent of the national average, respectively.

Fruits-Vegetables-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Fruits-Vegetables-Workers-Wages-GOM

Figure 2. Gulf of Mexico Region Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Feb. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 61.6 percent were males (Figure 3). About 38.4 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, relatively more men and fewer women worked and owned these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Canning-Pickling-Drying-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 3. Gender Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

 Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Feb. 2018) also grouped workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 4). The majority of the workers and owners are White (57%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (29.5%), and African American (8.3%). In the Gulf States, relatively more African American, and fewer White, Hispanic, and Asian people are employed in these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Canning-Pickling-Drying-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 4. Race or Ethnic Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview published by EMSI (Feb. 2018) also classified workers and owners by age (Figure 5). Almost three out of 10 of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners consisted of 26.7 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 20.1 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners comprise 23.8 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are relatively older than the national average.

Fruit-Vegetable-Canning-Pickling-Drying-Workers-Age--USA-GOMFigure 5. Age Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Merchant Wholesalers

Definition of Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Merchant Wholesalers

Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Merchant Wholesalers (NAICS 424480) “comprise establishments primarily engaged in the wholesale merchant distribution of fresh fruits and vegetables” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html).

Examples of establishments listed by the Bureau of Census includes the following:

  • Berries, fresh, merchant wholesalers;
  • Fresh fruits, vegetables, and berries merchant wholesalers;
  • Fruits, fresh, merchant wholesalers;
  • Health foods, fresh fruits, and vegetables, merchant wholesalers;
  • Produce, fresh, merchant wholesalers;
  • Salads, prepackaged, merchant wholesalers; and
  • Vegetables, fresh, merchant wholesalers.”

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

Fruits-Vegetables-Wholesalers-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

The number of jobs in the industry has been trending upward. On average, the industry directly created more than 89,000 jobs per year in the United States since 2001 (Figure 1). The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 17.4 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 2). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.38 and 0.53 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States have been slowly rising during the later part of the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged $56,400 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1).

Fruits-Vegetables--Wholesalers-Workers-Wages-GOM
Figure 2. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been slowly increasing during the later part of the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged $51,630 per person or 91.5 percent of the national average (Figure 2). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 78.7 and 82.2 percent of the national average, respectively.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Feb. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 71.9 percent were males (Figure 3). About 28.1 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, relatively more men and fewer women worked and owned these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Merchant-Wholesalers-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 3. Gender Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Feb. 2018) also grouped workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 4). The majority of the workers and owners are White (54.6%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (27.5%), African American (9.7%), and Asian (6.6%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer White, (46.6%) and Asian (3.2%), more Hispanic (33.9%) and African American (15.3%) people are working in these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Merchant-Wholesalers-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 4. Race or Ethnic Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview published by EMSI (Feb. 2018) also classified workers and owners by age (Figure 5). Almost one out of 4 of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners comprised of 26.1 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 23.1 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners comprise 27.3 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States have similar age distribution.

Fruit-Vegetable-Merchant-Wholesalers-Workers-Age--USA-GOM
Figure 5. Age Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Fruit and Vegetable Markets in the Gulf of Mexico and the United States

Definition of Fruit and Vegetable Markets

Fruit and vegetable markets (NAICS 445230) “comprise establishments primarily engaged in retailing fresh fruits and vegetables” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html). Examples of establishments listed by the Bureau of Census includes the following:

  • Fruit and vegetable stands, permanent
  • Fruit markets
  • Fruit stands, permanent
  • Produce markets
  • Produce stands, permanent
  • Vegetable markets

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

Table 1 shows the number of jobs in the entire industry since 2001. On average, the industry directly created about 54,000 jobs per year in the United States. Figure 2 shows the top 10 states which provided jobs in the fruit and vegetable markets in 2017. The state of New York topped the list contributing 13.7% of all the jobs in the industry and followed closely by the state of California with 12.8 percent of all the industry jobs.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States have been falling during most of the early part of the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged more than $35,000 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1).

Fruits-Vegetables--Markets-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Top-10-states-jobs-fruit-vegetable-markets-USA
Figure 2. The top 10 states in fruit and vegetable markets by percent of jobs in 2017.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed more than 7,700 jobs or 14.41 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 3). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.43 and 1.20 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been decreasing during most of the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged about $34,800 per person (at constant 2017 prices) or 98.26 percent of the national average (Figure 3). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 63.13 and 82.38 percent of the national average, respectively.

Fruits-Vegetables--Markets-Workers-Wages-GOM
Figure 3. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Mar. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 54,2 percent were males (Figure 4). About 45.8 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, similar proportions of men and women worked and owned these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Markets-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 4. Gender Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Mar. 2018) sorted workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 5). The majority of the workers and owners are White (63.3%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (20.4%), African American (8.1%), and Asian (6.7%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer White (57.0%), African American (7.9%), and Asian (5.5%) and more Hispanic (28.6%) people are working in these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Markets-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 5. Race or Ethnic Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.  Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview circulated by EMSI (Mar. 2018) grouped workers and owners by age (Figure 6). About 22.8 percent of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners involved 19.6 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 18.7 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners included 21.3 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are slightly older (41.79 years) as compared to the national average (40.51 years).

Fruit-Vegetable-Markets-Workers-Age--USA-GOM
Figure 6. Age Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Florists in the Gulf of Mexico and the United States

Definition of Florists

 Florists (NAICS 453110) “comprise establishments primarily engaged in retailing cut flowers, floral arrangements, and potted plants purchased from others. These establishments usually prepare the arrangements they sell.” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html).

Florists-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual employment and wages, salaries, and earnings of QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

Figure 1 shows the annual number of jobs in the florist industry which had been declining since 2001. On average, the florist industry directly created more than 140.000 jobs per year in the United States. Figure 2 shows the top 10 states which provided jobs in the florist industry in 2017. The state of California topped the list contributing 11.87% of all the jobs in the industry and followed by the state of Texas with 8.19 percent of all the industry jobs.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States have been falling during most of the early part of the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged more than $24,500 per person during the entire period (Figure 1).

Top-10-states-jobs-florists-USA
Figure 2. U.S. top 10 states in fruit and vegetable markets by percent of jobs in 2017.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed more than 24,800 jobs or 17.51 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 3). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 1.19 and 1.89 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been fluctuating during the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged about $24,000 per person (at constant 2017 prices) or 97.96 percent of the national average (Figure 3). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 83.11 and 81.69 percent of the national average, respectively.

Florists-Workers-Wages-GOM
Figure 3. Annual employment and wages, salaries, and earnings of QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Mar. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 28.6 percent were males (Figure 4). Majority of the workers and owners were females (71.4%). In the Gulf States, similar proportions of men and women worked and owned these businesses.

Florists-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 4. Gender distribution of QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Mar. 2018) sorted workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 5). The majority of the workers and owners are White (81.2%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (12.9%), African American (2.5%), and Asian (2.0%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer White (72.4%) and Asian (0.8%) and more Hispanic (21.4%) and African American (4.8%) people are working in these businesses.

Florists-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 5. Race or ethnic distribution of QCEW Employees, non-QCEW Employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors.  Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview circulated by EMSI (Mar. 2018) grouped workers and owners by age (Figure 6). About 43.7 percent of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners involved 20.7 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 16.5 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners included 19.0 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are slightly younger (48.44 years) as compared to the national average (48.86 years).

Florists-Workers-Age--USA-GOM
Figure 6. Age distribution of QCEW Employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker. 

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